Black chick

ArkAvian

In the Brooder
Nov 5, 2018
21
9
19
hatched a totally black chick. The mother a cross between a halfbreed Leghorn hen and Cornish cross roo. The father could be the brother from the same batch or it could be her own father OR a RIR looking roo I reverse bred from the red sex link chicks. I will upload more pics tomorrow. I need help in identifying really what I have combined from so many crosses. Only one black chick survived the rest died because the eggs were all double yolked. Also is that normal? The hen only lays a single yolk rarely all others are double yolked is this strange?
 

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Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Feb 2, 2009
27,315
20,193
907
Southeast Louisiana
hatched a totally black chick. The mother a cross between a halfbreed Leghorn hen and Cornish cross roo. The father could be the brother from the same batch or it could be her own father OR a RIR looking roo I reverse bred from the red sex link chicks. I will upload more pics tomorrow. I need help in identifying really what I have combined from so many crosses. Only one black chick survived the rest died because the eggs were all double yolked. Also is that normal? The hen only lays a single yolk rarely all others are double yolked is this strange?

It is possible for one or even two chicks to hatch from a double yolked egg but it is extremely rare to even get one. It usually takes a lot of intervention. Some people enjoy the challenge but I consider trying to hatch double yolked eggs setting yourself up for failure.

When a hen's internal egg-making factory is working the way it was designed, she releases one yolk a day. IF she releases two yolks in a day she might lay two eggs that day. Often the second one is soft-shelled or thin-shelled and often the shells are marked if they share space in the shell gland for a time. If she releases two yolks at a time and they go through that internal journey along her assembly line together you get a double yolked egg. If either of these occurs rarely it's not a big deal, we are all entitled to an occasional oops.

Some people consider a double yolked egg the neatest coolest thing ever and would love to have a hen that regularly laid double yolked eggs, but they do not suit my goals. I'm not going to try to hatch them, they usually don't fit in an egg carton, if I want an egg for a baking recipe they are not the right size or proportion. Having one that lays almost all double yolked eggs is pretty rare. Some people would love to have her, I would not. We all have different goals.

I don't know what that half-breed leghorn was bred from, the leghorn part could even be something other than white. I don't know what genetics you are working with in her. There are different ways to make a solid white chicken. You can do it with Dominant White on what would normally be a solid black chicken or Recessive White on about anything. Black is often used as a base to make white, but there are also different genetic ways to make a solid black chicken. When you are dealing with black chickens or white chickens you cannot always tell by looking what the genetics actually are. Right now I don't even know if that half-leghorn hen is white.

When you cross crosses you can get a lot of differences in the chicks' colors/patterns. Of course it depends on what you start with but it is not unusual when you breed crosses to crosses that you can get dozens of different possibilities. Black is pretty dominant so it does tend to limit those possibilities if it is in the mix.

It is possible the hen's hatchmate could be the father. It is possible your red rooster is the father. I could even come up with a scenario where your Cornish Cross could be the father if he is based on Recessive White. There is just no way of knowing for sure.
 

ArkAvian

In the Brooder
Nov 5, 2018
21
9
19
It is possible for one or even two chicks to hatch from a double yolked egg but it is extremely rare to even get one. It usually takes a lot of intervention. Some people enjoy the challenge but I consider trying to hatch double yolked eggs setting yourself up for failure.

When a hen's internal egg-making factory is working the way it was designed, she releases one yolk a day. IF she releases two yolks in a day she might lay two eggs that day. Often the second one is soft-shelled or thin-shelled and often the shells are marked if they share space in the shell gland for a time. If she releases two yolks at a time and they go through that internal journey along her assembly line together you get a double yolked egg. If either of these occurs rarely it's not a big deal, we are all entitled to an occasional oops.

Some people consider a double yolked egg the neatest coolest thing ever and would love to have a hen that regularly laid double yolked eggs, but they do not suit my goals. I'm not going to try to hatch them, they usually don't fit in an egg carton, if I want an egg for a baking recipe they are not the right size or proportion. Having one that lays almost all double yolked eggs is pretty rare. Some people would love to have her, I would not. We all have different goals.

I don't know what that half-breed leghorn was bred from, the leghorn part could even be something other than white. I don't know what genetics you are working with in her. There are different ways to make a solid white chicken. You can do it with Dominant White on what would normally be a solid black chicken or Recessive White on about anything. Black is often used as a base to make white, but there are also different genetic ways to make a solid black chicken. When you are dealing with black chickens or white chickens you cannot always tell by looking what the genetics actually are. Right now I don't even know if that half-leghorn hen is white.

When you cross crosses you can get a lot of differences in the chicks' colors/patterns. Of course it depends on what you start with but it is not unusual when you breed crosses to crosses that you can get dozens of different possibilities. Black is pretty dominant so it does tend to limit those possibilities if it is in the mix.

It is possible the hen's hatchmate could be the father. It is possible your red rooster is the father. I could even come up with a scenario where your Cornish Cross could be the father if he is based on Recessive White. There is just no way of knowing for sure.
The original half breed leghorn was full white with big eggs almost white but not quite. Will I get more black chicks from this one if its a pullet? Also why is the fur so short? And the legs beak and comb are also black
 

Feathers4Fun2

Songster
5 Years
Mar 11, 2016
112
117
161
Jayess, Mississippi
Quite the puzzle. Humm. Mating a Plymouth Barred Rock with a Rhode Island Red a rooster will produce a Black Sex link. If the chick is completely black it will be a hen if the chick has a black with a white spot on its head it will be a rooster. Unless you know for sure the breed of the parents its tough to know what's being produced.
 

ArkAvian

In the Brooder
Nov 5, 2018
21
9
19
Quite the puzzle. Humm. Mating a Plymouth Barred Rock with a Rhode Island Red a rooster will produce a Black Sex link. If the chick is completely black it will be a hen if the chick has a black with a white spot on its head it will be a rooster. Unless you know for sure the breed of the parents its tough to know what's being produced.
No bared rocks but I did get a barbed roo from the same leghorn cross. I've been breeding chicks for 1 year and I've never gotten another barbed chick.
 
Nov 2, 2018
3,784
54,153
1,042
NSW Australia
hatched a totally black chick. The mother a cross between a halfbreed Leghorn hen and Cornish cross roo. The father could be the brother from the same batch or it could be her own father OR a RIR looking roo I reverse bred from the red sex link chicks. I will upload more pics tomorrow. I need help in identifying really what I have combined from so many crosses. Only one black chick survived the rest died because the eggs were all double yolked. Also is that normal? The hen only lays a single yolk rarely all others are double yolked is this strange?
You should name the chick lucky LOl
 

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