Bloody Poop

Chicken-Man

Chirping
6 Years
Jan 8, 2014
396
8
81
your head.... ~(*.*)~
Hello,

I got two, 2 week old frizzle chicks the other day and woke up this morn to find blood in the poo. I have found out what bird has been doing it and not sure what to do. Here's so photos:
400


Both birds seem to be eating and drinking fine No other signs of sickness that I know of.

also, when I got the birds I was given this:
400

I was told to use this because a couple of birds had died from something and the medicine was just to be sure. Any one can tell me what needs to be done? Do I take it back?

Thanks.
 

LittleBrownie

4D Personality
6 Years
Sep 30, 2014
14,036
28,922
932
California
To be on the safe side, have your bird be checked by a vet. There is a diesease like what your bird is having, don't be alarmed hopefully it isn't its called Cocci it can be spread,if there is any other's in there with them they might have a chance of getting it. Best wishes for your chicks :)
 

cafarmgirl

Crowing
10 Years
Mar 24, 2009
5,521
610
327
California, central valley
You really don't need a vet unless you really want to spend lots of extra $$$. This is most likely coccidiosis. It's extremely common in young birds, probably the most common ailment in this age group. The good news is that it's easily treated. Go to the feed store or Tractor Supply and get some Corid, you may have to look in the cattle section. Comes in a powder or a liquid, doesn't matter which you use.

Dose for the liquid is two teaspoons per gallon of water. Make it up fresh every day and give that as the only source of water for 5 to 7 days.

Dose for the powder is 1.5 to 2 teaspoons per gallon, rest of treatment directions are the same as the liquid.

The caveat is that you need to do this ASAP, as in yesterday would have been better. Coccidiosis kills fast so you don't have time on your side. But if treatment is started right away the survival rate is very high.

Yes, coccidiosis can be spread. It is a protozoa that lives in the soil, so it's always around, you can't get rid of it. But birds do develop resistance to the strains of cocci in their environment as they mature. Young birds haven't had time to develop their own resistence so the protozoa reproduces out of control and overwhelms the chicks. Older birds can develop coccidiosis if you bring in new birds or young birds that expose them to a strain they are not resistant to. It pays to keep Corid on hand.

Edited to add: Just noticed the med you pictured is an amprolium product (same active ingredient as Corid). So yes, you can use that, I just have no idea what the dose would be. Did they give instructions for mixing?
 
Last edited:

Chicken-Man

Chirping
6 Years
Jan 8, 2014
396
8
81
your head.... ~(*.*)~
You really don't need a vet unless you really want to spend lots of extra $$$. This is most likely coccidiosis. It's extremely common in young birds, probably the most common ailment in this age group. The good news is that it's easily treated. Go to the feed store or Tractor Supply and get some Corid, you may have to look in the cattle section. Comes in a powder or a liquid, doesn't matter which you use.

Dose for the liquid is two teaspoons per gallon of water. Make it up fresh every day and give that as the only source of water for 5 to 7 days.

Dose for the powder is 1.5 to 2 teaspoons per gallon, rest of treatment directions are the same as the liquid.

The caveat is that you need to do this ASAP, as in yesterday would have been better. Coccidiosis kills fast so you don't have time on your side. But if treatment is started right away the survival rate is very high.

Yes, coccidiosis can be spread. It is a protozoa that lives in the soil, so it's always around, you can't get rid of it. But birds do develop resistance to the strains of cocci in their environment as they mature. Young birds haven't had time to develop their own resistence so the protozoa reproduces out of control and overwhelms the chicks. Older birds can develop coccidiosis if you bring in new birds or young birds that expose them to a strain they are not resistant to. It pays to keep Corid on hand.

Edited to add: Just noticed the med you pictured is an amprolium product (same active ingredient as Corid). So yes, you can use that, I just have no idea what the dose would be. Did they give instructions for mixing?
The day I bought the chicks, i was given a liquin medicine for Coccidiosis due to death in other chicks in the area, both birds have been using it for the past 4-5 days, still blood, but seems to be less blood.
 

Eggcessive

Addict
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Apr 3, 2011
58,775
50,263
1,302
southern Ohio
The Coccivet can be given 1 tsp or 5ml per 3 quarts of water. Some links call for 1 tsp per gallon, or 15 ml per 10 liters. I would probably use the more strong concentration, especially since this is a pidgeon medicine.
 

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