BLUE ISBARS - Pictures and discussion

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Phage, Dec 26, 2011.

  1. lonnyandrinda

    lonnyandrinda Overrun With Chickens

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    That stinks.... sorry...
     
  2. LadyCluck77

    LadyCluck77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    For the experienced incubators, I'm hearing different humidity levels during incubation? I have a Brinsea, and the directions that came with it list 30 to 40 percent during the first part, and then 60 percent at lockdown. But then they go on to say that recent experiments find higher humidity can lead to an even better hatch.... ?

    For my first run, I'm hatching RIR from a friend as a sort of test run, and then I'll be hatching Isbars and cream Legbars. Does the breed make a difference in the humidity level setting? Should I lower it for the Legbars and Isbars, or raise it?
    From what I hear, they may also need more time...
    Sorry for all the questions, I'm starting a hatch soon, so I'm nervous :/
     
  3. I'm no expert, but I have good luck with my cabinet GQF running totally dry (20-24%) until lockdown at 65%. Last hatch on Wednesday was 100% chicks, which was great! Primarily I hatch Marans, which are a thicker shell like Isbars. When I did 35% RH for the first part of set and then 65% for lockdown/hatch, I had over 50% fully formed but non-hatched chicks. 22 dead, it was heartbreaking. 6 had pipped internally and drowned, the rest didn't pip at all. My Marans hatch at just about 21 days and same when I hatched some Isbars in December, but others are having them hatch up to 3 days late.
     
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  4. lonnyandrinda

    lonnyandrinda Overrun With Chickens

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    I think it depends a lot on your local climate. Your best advice will come from someone who lives near you that hatches. In general anywhere from 20-40% humidity the first 18 days and then you want it higher, 35-60% for the last 3 days. It will take some trial and error to find the best setting for your incubator and climate. The size of the air cell is your best judge of humidity the egg needs to be roughly 1/3 air when it's time to hatch. Keep an eye on your air cells by candling every seven days and adjust your humidity accordingly.
     
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  5. warbirds

    warbirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sorry, I probably should have taken the time to be a bit more descriptive. I too have Marans that hatch in 21 days. But, I also have older established Marans lines that lay large almost round eggs that take 22 - 24 days to hatch. Those chicks come out big - almost twice the size of other lines of Marans.

    I use the GQF 1500 Professional incubator and the GQF 1550 hatcher for most of my incubations, but also use the GQF Genesis Hovabators for smaller sets, and often put Isbar orders in those to keep them from having issues with me pulling other chicks out of the main incubator.

    I am also at 5000 ft. above sea level, so that has an affect on the development of all embryos, most especially the dark eggs and the very large eggs. :)

    Doc
     
  6. warbirds

    warbirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I suppose I can see an attraction in that as well................that said, through selective breeding (applying same selections used in improving Marans egg color), nearly every mature Isbar hen I have lays what I would call a dark green olive egg at least once or twice a week, with lighter greens in between. Anything less, in my humble opinion, is a step backwards in Isbar breeding/selection, as the breed was intended to lay a dark green egg. Any hen who can't cut the mustard by the time she is mature, is not used for breeding.

    Do you find that your Marans that lay 7-8 have a better hatch rate when they start to lighten up later in their laying cycle? In my breeders, it all depends on the line(s) the hens come from, at least that has been my long-term observation here.........again, I'm at 5000 ft. and that elevation has an effect on incubation/hatch as it is. I'm just always curious how other breeders' darker egg layers do in their hatch rates as they move along to the lighter end of their laying cycle. Every piece of knowledge is another piece of the total puzzle! :)

    Doc
     
  7. warbirds

    warbirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Doc
     
  8. lawatt

    lawatt Chillin' With My Peeps

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  9. Waiting for a pip from the one little Isbar egg that went on walkabout with the USPS for seven days with no tracking for the first four days. I still can't believe that it survived to lockdown.

    The second batch will need a candling in a few days to see if any made the trip from Ramona CA to NW Oregon via Providence RI. Interesting routing, USPS...also 7 days in transit.
     
  10. lonnyandrinda

    lonnyandrinda Overrun With Chickens

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    Wow... [​IMG]

    Well I think I'm cleared from last year's Isbar infection fiasco! Both chicks from my first hatch are now about 7 weeks old (a black pair), and I have a set of 8 that are 5 weeks old. My "danger zone" last year was 3-4 weeks. Yay!!!!
     

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