BREEDING FOR PRODUCTION...EGGS AND OR MEAT.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by hellbender, Dec 27, 2013.

  1. Dead Rabbit

    Dead Rabbit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I noticed a couple times through out this thread that toe marking was mentioned

    The way to do this is through punching or cutting the toe web. I started out with punching but quickly left that for cutting. I found either the punches grew back or tore out or never really was a good clean punch to start.
    Cutting the web was a lot more effective. It lasted forever. And there is no mistaking what you have done. A tore out punch looks like a cut. Go to pharmacy store and buy a pair of cuticle scissors. They are sharp and tiny. Perfect for marking. I liked to cut out entire web between the toes. Not just a cut. This way you can see the mark even from a short distance. Do this at a day old or less and there is no bleeding. Wait a couple days and the webbing is slightly thicker and even easier to cut still little to no bleeding. But the chick is livelier and little harder to hold steady

    Another way to mark is by actually notching the nostrils. The flap of skin. Over the nostril. I've never been able to actually notch it. It's too tiny. But it canbe totally cut off. With little trouble and no bleeding. Seems to not cause any pain at all. I rarely used this method. Not having that many fowl on my yard but have done it before
     
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  2. Dead Rabbit

    Dead Rabbit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Earlier someone mentioned using bantams. I thought if this yrs ago. I used to raise SQ. OLD ENGLISH BANTAMS. Those little birds had the meatiest most compact bodies. Tiny yet a lot of meat packed in a small area. They didn't lay good but I swear the OEGB eggs have the best flavor of any type I ever raised. Even penned raised using commercial feed. The eggs were excellent.

    I can imagine this could be a good project for those that don't feed a lot of people have very limited space and limited funds They can be raised in small cages. Consume next to nothing in feed. Can forage well on their own. And much more pleasing to the eye than the much mentioned turkens Buckeyes, hampshires, Cornish. Etc.
     
  3. Dead Rabbit

    Dead Rabbit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Fine looking specimen. I have a very deep appreciation and love for the canine. After fowl the dog is a very close second. Then the horse comes in a distant third. I do love to ride.
     
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  4. Dead Rabbit

    Dead Rabbit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    RR I'm fascinated with the bird in your avatar. A beautiful. Heritage rir . Actually the best I've ever seen. I love the build. If he has a frame and muscle tone to match what I see on the surface than I'd have to call him perfect. Just my opinion. I'm not up on the standard. I breed for what I like to see. I don't have an aversion to feathering. I'm of the old thought that a heavily feathered fowl is a well bred bird. I don't mind feeding extra protein for heavy featheration. Feathers are there for a reason.
    In my opinion the only fowl that I'd allow poor featheration is the commercial layers. Which I support and use and then some of the oriental breeds or their crosses
     
  5. RedRidge

    RedRidge Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you. No he is not perfect. There is no such thing. Lol. He was just a youngster in that picture taken early last fall and hatched last spring. He took Reserve BOV to one of my pullets in Dec. He's a neat boy.
    I rarely show, but when it's close to home it's hard to resist. I have two hens in mind for him but am holding him back since I'm using his father again this year. One of the things I like best about him is that he's from hens who are very productive, laying more than 75% in the breeding pens last year and they began laying at 26 weeks. It doesn't matter to me how beautiful a bird is if it isn't productive. There are too many RIR out there that don't lay well and hit pol way past the age I would like to see.
    Appreciate your comments.
     
  6. bnjrob

    bnjrob Overrun With Chickens

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    The only thing you have to do with the zip ties (and plastic spiral bands) is to change them out periodically before the UV exposure degrades them and they break off. But otherwise, they work fine so you should be good with them.

    We use a combo of colored/numbered aluminum *permanent* bands, along with zip ties and spiral rings. The aluminum bands let us know YEAR of hatch by the color, the zip ties and spiral rings let us ID at a glance by hatch (first, second, third in a year), bloodline, parents, and individual. And if the spiral rings or zip ties break off before I change them out, then I have the aluminum band that has their number and I can go back and see what colored spiral/zip bands they had on to be able to replace them. I like the idea of the wing bands, but I don't feel like having to chase down a chicken to figure out who it is. And when watching chickens in a group for evaluation, or trying to catch an injured chicken, it helps to have the colored bands to know which one you're looking at so they can't blend into the crowd.
     
  7. chickadoodles

    chickadoodles True BYC Addict

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  8. bnjrob

    bnjrob Overrun With Chickens

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    I haven't had a problem putting on the aluminum bands, even by myself. I just stuff the bird under my left arm and use my left hand to hold their leg out and the band, and with my right hand I bend the band around their leg and use the crimping tool that crimps the button over the hole in the band. I get the adjustable size bands that come together like a rivet or grommet, I don't use the bands that the ends butt together. Maybe that is the difference in being able to do it easier.
     
  9. jbkirk

    jbkirk A Learning Breeder

    Thanks for finally answering my question!!!!!
     
  10. Heron's Nest Farm

    Heron's Nest Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Next Questions:

    Where do you get your spirals? Numbered zip ties?

    What size rings do you buy for chicks? Adult heavies?
     

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