BREEDING FOR PRODUCTION...EGGS AND OR MEAT.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by hellbender, Dec 27, 2013.

  1. Dead Rabbit

    Dead Rabbit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Can't remeber who had the speck. Sussex. On this thread. But I'm curious as to how they turned out in regards to production. Egg quality, color and lay ability.

    I'm getting ready to order replacement pullets and wanted something different to go along with my commercial layers. But want something that will produce a lot of eggs
     
  2. hellbender

    hellbender Overrun With Chickens

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    Might have been Sharon, in PA.
     
  3. bramblefir

    bramblefir Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I only have a couple of Speckled Sussex, but thought I'd chime in with. They started laying just before 20 weeks (even beat the RC Leghorns!) and I would say they're typically in the 4-5 per week range. The egg size is similar to all of my other layers (except the Hamburgs). They lay a darker brown than everyone besides the Welsummer.

    Welsummer, Speckled Sussex, Barred Rock, and Leghorn eggs:
    [​IMG]

    Mine are also very curious, always first out of the run, and rather friendly for how little handling they get. It's not uncommon to see my 5 year old carrying them around, whereas all the other birds run from her as fast as they can.
     
  4. hellbender

    hellbender Overrun With Chickens

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    A while back, I mentioned on another thread that I allowed a 7 month Buckeye pullet set on a clutch of eggs (The eggs were Buckeye-over NN). She hatched six of them and my daughter took them into the new hatch house to care for them.

    I honestly never dreamed she would stay with the set, even though I only allowed her to set because she was driving me nuts, trying to break the set. We plan to try to use brooders when we can but only in good weather. WE will not be hatching anywhere near the number of birds that we are accustomed to so we're hoping to have enough broody hens to do the job for us.

    The chicks are very nice, big and heavily boned. They did not come without a very serious............appetite!!!
     
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  5. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    Haha they better grow out with tons of meat then! Would love to see pics of them someday. Buckeyes are walnut combed, right..?
     
  6. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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  7. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    Feb 19, 2011
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  8. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    Feb 19, 2011
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  9. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    SS are not supposed to be super layers. Mine lay about daily though-- moer than the breed is supposed to. . Egg color is a very pale tan. I rather like the birds themselves.

    Generally the SS I bought from Meyers are better layers than they are supposed to be, which doesn't surprise me when egg laying is top priority at the commercial chick producing facilities.

    Look to rhode Island reds as great layers; or dels, or . . . . who has that chart???? WHere is Ron Ottman???? I know he has it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2015
  10. hellbender

    hellbender Overrun With Chickens

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    No Kev, Buckeyes have pea combs. EDIT...but I like walnut, rose and other combs.

    My daughter Ariel is the 'mommy' and I'm sure she is far more likely to take pics than I or either of my sons. I'll ask her to take a few since she spends hours with them. These chicks and the new Florida W. bunnies keep her smiling and considering her condition when she got here, it makes me smile too!!! lolol

    I have just a bit of fear (apprehension) that these could turn into pigs, like the CornishX but then I just think for a second and realize it a whole different ball game. But, these almost have to be large birds and large appetites shouldn't be a surprise...lol


    And ...EDIT to Arielle: American Rare breed Dog Assn.

    http://www.arba.org/#curtain3
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2015

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