BREEDING FOR PRODUCTION...EGGS AND OR MEAT.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by hellbender, Dec 27, 2013.

  1. Dead Rabbit

    Dead Rabbit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I dabbled with jersey Giants last year. Really did like them but it was like feeding pigs. I scrapped the plan late December sold all the flock off. I seriously doubt you will be pleased with using them for meat production.
     
  2. Beer can

    Beer can Overrun With Chickens

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    It doesn't bother me how much they eat, as long as I can cut costs. I just want to see how big I can grow them.
    Going to start feeding fermented feed to my existing laying hens as soon as we start getting warmer weather, or maybe I could start feeding them some now as long as it isn't more than they can eat before it freezes in our subzero temps.
     
  3. Beer can

    Beer can Overrun With Chickens

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    One thing I read in a old book on Giants is that many people have made the mistake of breeding for quicker growth. They culled out the ones that didn't put on weight as fast. By doing so they lost size. This coming from a old time breeder of Giants, he said the slower filling out scrawnier when their younger stock end up being the larger birds in the long run. I figure I'll probably feed the pigs at least a year before selecting breeding stock. Plan on doing the same with the langshans.
    Might be awhile before I can try a good number of capons with the breed. So I plan on hatching out my Welsummers and selling the pullets and using the cockerels to practice caponing.
     
  4. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    Birds with the large, longer, and taller frames take longer to fill out. Frame comes before flesh. The Jersey Giant was developed to be a meat bird, but efficiency was not their claim to fame. They could certainly make good extra large capons though. That is if they are appropriately sized giants beforehand.
     
  5. Dead Rabbit

    Dead Rabbit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    pouring the feed to them like you will have to is not cutting costs. And a breed like this can't forage and hustle up near enough to accomplish their full potential.

    My last brood cock was right at 20 lbs and still had no real meat value to him. He had some monstrous legs on him but no thighs breast etc. he wasn't a cock at all he was only 18 months old and still growing. They don't even mature till 2 yrs of age. He was from a slow growing line from a breeder not hatchery stock.

    Now if you want to create a giant breed of gargantuous proportions. I say cool deal. Go for it and keep me informed. U are doing what I wanted to do.
     
  6. Dead Rabbit

    Dead Rabbit Chillin' With My Peeps

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  7. RedRidge

    RedRidge Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We ferment also, but not prepackaged pellets. I have two different rations, one for winter months and another for when they are out. I ferment only the grains which we grind ourselves, all other ingredients such as limestone, alfalfa meal, animal proteins, etc get added each day by weight to the already fermented grains. You have less nutritional waste of your non-grain ingredients and a lot less of a sticky mess, yet still the added benefits of fermenting.
     
  8. Beer can

    Beer can Overrun With Chickens

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    Wow! 20lb Giant! I was going to get my stock from Maria Hall, Maria's Giants. But then I got thinking whites would be the best option if I ever wanted to get into small scale capon farming. Nobody seems to have whites, except for a couple hatcherys. I don't know how their birds are but I ended ordering from SandHill Preservation Center. He claims his are a closed flock originally from Golda Miller, a old time breeder of blacks and whites. Reading Maria Halls site she got her stock from Golda Miller when she died, and has some nice big show quality birds, but only in black, blue and splash. It might take awhile to breed the whites up to their potential, but I'm going to give it a try.
     
  9. neopolitancrazy

    neopolitancrazy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I read the same, in an old book on Wyandottes, (circa 1890,) where the author reminded people that if they selected for birds larger than standard weights, the Wyandottes would be slow to reach final size, and would be poor broilers/fryers. At the time, the author was bragging on what fabulous plump broilers he had from his 5 week old Wyandottes. Fast forward to this year, when I purchased beautiful Wyandotte cockerels and pullets, from a show-oriented line. Feathers and bones, but packing on the flesh now, and I will eventually know their adult weight. I want decent meat on my fryers, so will be selecting for chicks that reach cockerel and pullet weights by 6 months, and adult weights by 12 months, and not aiming for the "super-sized" show-winning birds.
    Best wishes,
    Angela
     
  10. dfr1973

    dfr1973 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'd be interested in that old book! If I can convince the chicks to *pose* for the camera, instead of rushing forward for food, I could get a pic of the one cockerel I have from Luanne who is so much bigger than the other three - even though they are the same age, it is very noticeable at five weeks. I was just out there with my camera. It is cold this morning and the bird-brains are refusing to cooperate. Maybe I can snap a pic or two when they do their early-afternoon siesta in the sun. meanwhile, the two dozen from Ideal are getting in some lovely colored feathers now. Attempts at pics have only yielded blurs of black and gold as they zip around the brooder tub that they have almost outgrown.
     

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