BREEDING FOR PRODUCTION...EGGS AND OR MEAT.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by hellbender, Dec 27, 2013.

  1. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    Double post.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2015
  2. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    He lacks a well rounded breast, and has a shallow keel.

    He does have good width for his type. The shanks are appropriately sized for his size.

    He would be a bird that is heavier than he appears. Many are just the opposite. These days we depend too much on feather to define the type. Feather should only refine transitions and accent type. Not make the type.

    The under fluff obscures the thighs, and has to be felt for. That is typical, but he appears to have good thighs for the type.
     
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  3. Beer can

    Beer can Chicken Obsessed

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    Are you sure chickens don't learn? I saw one acting on Saturday Night Live the other night Lol.
    Yeah I'd say my fathers were probably genetic. They looked like pure rc RIR but I know he mixed some of what he called back in the early '80s 'fighting banties' not sure what kind of bantam it was but it probably could explain why his reds were good broodies. I think he liked a mean rooster because they were free ranged.
    I personally won't have it, not going to make my kids afraid to go outside. We had to stay clear of where they were and avoid the flock.
     
  4. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    Of course they learn, but this trait we have been discussing is genetic. The darned things have a few screws loose, and we perpetuate it by breeding them.

    I picked this up as a kid. I had a few along the way. I had a habit of keeping just one male, and that was a bad habit. That was before I knew any better.

    It is not a breed thing. It is strain or line thing, and can become established quickly by tolerating it.

    There is a misconception that they are better protectors etc. They are often the first to tuck and run when things go bad. Most of them (not all of them) like to get you when your back is turned LOL. They are not all of the same of course.

    When I was a kid, I had no building skills so I did not have a gate to my pen. I had chicken wire nailed around a group of trees. I had to cross it, in and out. With one rooster I was never concerned going in. It was the coming out that was a problem. LOL. I knew to cross a little faster coming out than going in. Especially if I had shorts on. I put up with it because I did not know any better.

    I had ducks (Pekins) at the time, and had the same problem but it was not spurs I was worried about. It was the bill. That darned thing would leave some nasty blood blisters on a pair of bare legs.

    It is a wonder I ever kept an interest at all. It is not worth all of that.

    Along the way I realized that it was genetic, and could be bred for or against.

    I have kids to, and they help with the birds. One has birds of his own. Some little game bantams. They will not tolerate it either. They would be quick to say that "he has to go".
     
  5. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    I've never had the misfortune to have a mean acting rooster in all these years, which is pretty amazing when you think about it....I've had many breeds from many sources and even some breeds that folks always report nastiness from~leghorns, RIR, etc. I've had a few try on the human for size...mostly cockerels coming into sexual maturity and a quick correction changed their mind and attitudes completely and for good, never to be repeated. After that many years and birds, I tend to doubt there are many true "man-fighter" roosters out there and certainly not as many as I read about on BYC...if there were, surely by the law of averages, I'd have run across one of those in the past 40 yrs.

    I have noticed this, though...some people seem to have "mean" roosters no matter what breed they have or from what genetic source. Funny thing is, these same people seem to have unruly dogs, bratty and unmanageable children, mean tom turkeys, nasty geese, bratty horses....you name it, if they've raised it from a youngin', they've got bratty creatures on their hands. I think most any creature can learn when they've got a pushover in charge of them and push those boundaries, learn what they can get away with and then act out on it. Those very same creatures~be it human, animal or bird~can have another person walk into their territory and get vast~and immediate~differences in behavior from that creature...be it human or animal.

    Just like any other creature, chickens fall under that nature vs. nurture type of controversy and most scientists have pretty much agreed that it's mostly a combination of both of these things that form the personality/temperament of most any creature.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2015
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  6. Beer can

    Beer can Chicken Obsessed

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    @Beekissed Nah, Lol. My parents raised good kids, our dog a beagle bluetic mix was a sweetheart. Dad just liked his roosters mean.
    Never had a problem with predators for many years, not even dogs. But maybe he was just lucky.

    My five kids are a little on the bratty side, little monsters, and I have a rooster that is calmer and nicer than any of the hens.
     
  7. DesertChic

    DesertChic Overrun With Chickens

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    This is most definitely the case with me. This cockerel is part of my first flock of chickens and just happens to be my son's favorite bird, and up until this situation had been one of my favorites as well. I had promised my son from the start that I wouldn't butcher any of my first flock birds unless there was a problem. Well...aggressiveness is most definitely a problem. I've found myself sizing up this cockerel in an effort to determine how much meat I'll get off of him, and I've already informed my husband that it's time for us to set up the slaughter station. But...yesterday I had a "talk" with this cockerel and he submitted to me pretty darn quickly. Still no problems with him this morning. I've set a deadline of Spring Break. If he gives me any more grief between now and then he'll become Spring Break Roast Chicken with Honey, Lemon and Rosemary. [​IMG]
     
  8. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    Be sure if you like him. Occasionally a cockerel will test the waters, but that does not mean he will end up a problem.

    You will know if he is or not in time.

    It has nothing to do with management. Some just are. Fortunately, most are not, except in some lines.
     
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  9. hellbender

    hellbender Overrun With Chickens

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    Grinder's Switch
    Aside from the 'pain in the butt' so deftly dealt a while back by the Naked Neck, the absolutely worst floggings I have ever received have been by bantam cocks and we never owned a single bantam...ever.

    When I was young, I would visit the homes of various friends and it seemed that everyone but us had the spiteful little things and they were quick to take offense. We were never allowed to defend ourselves, on penalty of death aka (Azz Beating) so we had to do our best to stay clear of them....more often than not, having to leave the vicinity of their homes and entertaining ourselves in the nearby woods. We usually carried our BB guns and you can have ON idea how often we plotted our revenge but none of us (that I'm aware of) had the nerve to actually shoot one of the miserable things! [​IMG]
     
  10. hellbender

    hellbender Overrun With Chickens

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