Breeding Sulmtaler from 6 Rooster Lines and 3 Hen Lines with Spiral Breeding

Abulukas

In the Brooder
Apr 7, 2017
2
3
24
I have 6 separate lines of Rooster and 6 lines of hens (the 3 hen lines are identical to 3 of the 6 rooster lines). I'm working to set up a Spiral Breeding program, but it seems daunting. I've worked out spreadsheets for the next generations and think I understand enough to begin but would appreciate feedback if I'm messing something up (or if I should be using Clan Mating). I'm thinking of just mating the first generation (what I'm beginning with) for the first year and then there will be a diversity in the lines to begin the normal Spiral Breeding program where all Females stay with the mother and the two best males are selected to move over to mate with the females in the next run.

I would appreciate any advice....
These two lines from Austria and four from Germany that I've bought and raised from eggs.

MALE LINES
A B C D E F
Female Lines
a b c

Initial Mating
Ac Ba Cb Dc Ea Fb
 

Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Feb 2, 2009
27,296
20,166
907
Southeast Louisiana
I'm not sure what traits you are breeding to or what your ultimate goals are, but do all six lines meet your criteria? Should you possibly eliminate one or two lines?

The way I read that you plan to take the best two males in each group and breed them to all females in the destination group. You might consider only using the best male from each group and breeding him to only the best one or two females in the next group. You should get better quality that way.

I'm trying to wrap my head around six groups. That is a slow spiral to work your way around. If you are trying to improve that might be a slow process. But if you are happy with the quality it should be a good maintenance system.

It is an interesting approach, I wish you luck.
 

Abulukas

In the Brooder
Apr 7, 2017
2
3
24
As a whole the six males and the females all have jgood traits. I will keep and use only 6 roosters to begin and will use hens with those roosters that are from one line and have the best compliments to the rooster’s weakness. My goal is to continue to selectively breed this existing stock to have six lines that carry a diversity of genes that I will be able to continue breeding On the long term while maintaining breed standards. I could eliminate lines, but that seems to me to only serve to limit my genetic diversity. But that may me where I’m getting off track....
 

ChickenLeg

Crowing
9 Years
Feb 15, 2012
1,399
1,590
297
A 4 pen breeding pin can last around 15 years without needing any new blood, which most breeding programs never go 15 years. So I wouldnt be overly concerned about genetic diversity if you decide to remove a couple of the lines. And like above poster said, less lines are easier to manage and maintain selected traits. Best of luck breeding!
 

Mossy Dell

Songster
5 Years
Dec 1, 2015
163
173
152
Southwestern VA
I have 6 separate lines of Rooster and 6 lines of hens (the 3 hen lines are identical to 3 of the 6 rooster lines). I'm working to set up a Spiral Breeding program, but it seems daunting. I've worked out spreadsheets for the next generations and think I understand enough to begin but would appreciate feedback if I'm messing something up (or if I should be using Clan Mating). I'm thinking of just mating the first generation (what I'm beginning with) for the first year and then there will be a diversity in the lines to begin the normal Spiral Breeding program where all Females stay with the mother and the two best males are selected to move over to mate with the females in the next run.

I would appreciate any advice.... These two lines from Austria and four from Germany that I've bought and raised from eggs.

MALE LINES
A B C D E F
Female Lines
a b c

Initial Mating
Ac Ba Cb Dc Ea Fb

I think six lines is great! There is no law how many you must raise each year from a clan.

Also, you can actually combine clan mating with single mating. So one hen and one cock get mated most years. Or keep two three-clan flocks. One clan gets mated every other year; occasionally bring in new blood from the other clan.

The point is that there are countless ways to run clan matings. And also that the number you raise is up to you. The males probably need separate pens, but females can run together until you mate up the clan pens every year. Good records are vital, but some of us like keeping records too.

Selection and diversity are in tension but can coexist.
 

Egghead_Jr

Crowing
10 Years
Oct 16, 2010
7,479
3,536
436
NEK, VT
You may find some of the lines don't niche. Starting with many lines is good if your going this route because once you test mate them find only a few lines will combine well. Combs are the most common problem when crossing lines, side sprigs abound. Other problems too but it's fair to say some lines won't niche.
 

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