Brooder location

Jaybird33

Hatching
Mar 25, 2020
12
1
8
Hi Peeps
New here and to backyard chickens.
Picking up our chicks this Saturday. We live in the Northeast and just wondering where to set up the brooder. I think the garage maybe pretty chilly during the overnights.
I was told not keep them in our living area.
Looking for some advice
Thanks
 

Uff Da

Songster
Apr 27, 2019
298
761
146
Montana
We've always kept ours in our living area, since I was just a little kid. Were you told this was a health risk? It is somewhat, because of histoplasmosis and "poultry keeper's lung." But our living area is well-ventilated, and we move them outdoors fairly soon (3-4 weeks). Cleaning a dusty coop is far riskier than having chicks in your house. Plus, they get used to you and are easier to evaluate for health issues.

Eta: either way, you will be providing them with heat, right?
 

Jaybird33

Hatching
Mar 25, 2020
12
1
8
We've always kept ours in our living area, since I was just a little kid. Were you told this was a health risk? It is somewhat, because of histoplasmosis and "poultry keeper's lung." But our living area is well-ventilated, and we move them outdoors fairly soon (3-4 weeks). Cleaning a dusty coop is far riskier than having chicks in your house. Plus, they get used to you and are easier to evaluate for health issues.

Eta: either way, you will be providing them with heat, right?
We've always kept ours in our living area, since I was just a little kid. Were you told this was a health risk? It is somewhat, because of histoplasmosis and "poultry keeper's lung." But our living area is well-ventilated, and we move them outdoors fairly soon (3-4 weeks). Cleaning a dusty coop is far riskier than having chicks in your house. Plus, they get used to you and are easier to evaluate for health issues.

Eta: either way, you will be providing them with heat, right?
Thanks for the response Uff Da
I hadn’t even heard about the two things you mentioned. I was told that regarding salmonella. When you say your living area is well ventilated what does that mean. Still cold up here and have hot water baseboard heat when the stove isn’t going with the fan.
 

Jaybird33

Hatching
Mar 25, 2020
12
1
8
Thanks for the response Uff Da
I hadn’t even heard about the two things you mentioned. I was told that regarding salmonella. When you say your living area is well ventilated what does that mean. Still cold up here and have hot water baseboard heat when the stove isn’t going with the fan.
Yes have a brooder heater and a heat lamp.
 

50-45-1

Crowing
12 Years
Some folks dont like chicks in the house due to the dust and dander that will start to acumullate after the first week.
Have always kept my chicks in a cardboard box brooder in the kitchen for at least a week. I love watching them and this helps me identify any that may need my attenation due to pasty but or general weakness.
Not sure where the salmonella would come in unless you handle chicks and poop, then handle something like food without washing your hands?
50 years of chicks in my kitchen here with no incident.
Congrats on your new chicks!
 

Uff Da

Songster
Apr 27, 2019
298
761
146
Montana
Thanks for the response Uff Da
I hadn’t even heard about the two things you mentioned. I was told that regarding salmonella. When you say your living area is well ventilated what does that mean. Still cold up here and have hot water baseboard heat when the stove isn’t going with the fan.
They are in our living room, which is big and open. So lots of ventilation compared to, say, a closet or bathroom.

Re: salmonella....You get salmonella from handling chicks, not having them in your living area. :rolleyes: So you are just as likely to get it if they are outside and you pick them up. In any case, the risk of salmonella infection is practically eliminated by washing your hands after handling animals (not just chickens). Whoever told you that was sorely misinformed.
 

Jaybird33

Hatching
Mar 25, 2020
12
1
8
Some folks dont like chicks in the house due to the dust and dander that will start to acumullate after the first week.
Have always kept my chicks in a cardboard box brooder in the kitchen for at least a week. I love watching them and this helps me identify any that may need my attenation due to pasty but or general weakness.
Not sure where the salmonella would come in unless you handle chicks and poop, then handle something like food without washing your hands?
50 years of chicks in my kitchen here with no incident.
Congrats on your new chicks!
Thanks! 50
Thanks for the response
We have open floor plan. Living room kitchen,dining area all one room
I guess I’ll try them out in that area
Thanks for the info
 

Jaybird33

Hatching
Mar 25, 2020
12
1
8
They are in our living room, which is big and open. So lots of ventilation compared to, say, a closet or bathroom.

Re: salmonella....You get salmonella from handling chicks, not having them in your living area. :rolleyes: So you are just as likely to get it if they are outside and you pick them up. In any case, the risk of salmonella infection is practically eliminated by washing your hands after handling animals (not just chickens). Whoever told you that was sorely misinformed.
Ok sounds like i have a plan
Appreciate the info!
Thanks again!
 

rosemarythyme

Free Ranging
Jul 3, 2016
6,923
13,411
642
WA, Pac NW
My Coop
My Coop
I've brooded in a spare bathroom and I've brooded outside. Never again inside... the dander just a few chicks can put out over 5 or 6 weeks is amazing. The chicks were brooded in a bathtub, I was scrubbing oily filth off the tub, up the tile and the wall some 6', all the way across the floor to the sink and sink cabinet that sat facing the tub.
 
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