Broody breeds

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by bigz1983, Sep 5, 2019.

  1. bigz1983

    bigz1983 Songster

    385
    338
    171
    Aug 9, 2016
    Michigan
    We have 5 hatchery stock black australorps.
    They are from the same hatchery, same age as our buff orpingtons and none of them have went broody either.
    The barred rock hen that went broody last year was not hatchery stock.
    We got her from a breeder.
     
  2. ConnieA

    ConnieA Songster

    239
    564
    181
    Mar 9, 2015
    Just my opinion, but I think that most of us small breeders prefer broody birds, since they help prevent the expense of extra incubator space. I think that the big breeders work with so many more chickens, it's not worthwhile for them to select for broodiness, one way or another.
     
  3. bigz1983

    bigz1983 Songster

    385
    338
    171
    Aug 9, 2016
    Michigan
    This is really what I want in a chicken breed
    -Large breed for dual purpose meat/eggs
    -Goes broody reliably
    -Clean legged(Don't really care for feathered feet)
    -Rose comb(better for winters in my region)
    The Wyandotte meets most of this critea but not sure about broodiness?
    I have one Wyandotte and she has never gone broody.
     
    SurferchickinSB and MROO like this.
  4. SueT

    SueT Crossing the Road

    6,806
    16,510
    777
    May 27, 2015
    SW MO
    I had one Wyandotte for about 3 years, never went broody.
     
    SurferchickinSB likes this.
  5. varidgerunner

    varidgerunner Songster

    1,037
    1,160
    246
    Aug 16, 2013
    I hatch out everything with standard sized american gamefowl or oriental gamefowl, just like people have for years.Always wondered why my grandma spoke fondly of the gamefowl she had in the days before electricity. Finally figured it out. She never spoke fondly of silkies, because they weren't used for anything but oddities, then as now.

    My orientals- 1. Have long lifespan. At least 10, 20 years not uncommon. 2. 99.9 percent of females go broody. Some of the roosters even go broody, so it probably means you have a 120% chance of getting a broody hen. 3. Go broody early, after the first few eggs are laid. 4. Go broody often. 5. Can raise chicks on free range, fighting off predators up to the possum, skunk, raccoon class. Even the hens can take out a hawk. Will raise large commotion and make larger predators think twice about losing an eye. Using extreme wariness, athleticism, and the ability to see in the dark they do quite well. They have very high hatching success and chick survival. 6. large enough to set a large clutch of standard sized eggs, excess cockerels have large breast and are very tasty. Take longer to grow than their modern cornish descendants, but it doesn't cost you anything as they do it in the woods on bugs and seeds. 7. Males are the best companions you could ever have. Lower incidence of human aggression than any other breed of chicken. More tame and laid back than any other breed, can be trusted with small children, dressed up in doll clothes, taken to grocery store, etc.
     
    bigz1983 and ConnieA like this.
  6. bigz1983

    bigz1983 Songster

    385
    338
    171
    Aug 9, 2016
    Michigan
    Is that the same chicken set as your avatar?
    I will look more into them.
    They kinda like look the cornish or Indian game.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2019
  7. varidgerunner

    varidgerunner Songster

    1,037
    1,160
    246
    Aug 16, 2013
    My avatar is an asil, yes. They mixed some barnyard mutts with Asil and came up with the Cornish, probably the reason for the resemblance.
     
    bigz1983 likes this.
  8. bigz1983

    bigz1983 Songster

    385
    338
    171
    Aug 9, 2016
    Michigan
    How do they handle cold weather?
     
  9. Kathleen Sanderson

    Kathleen Sanderson In the Brooder

    9
    18
    24
    Oct 29, 2017
    I've never had a Buff Orpington go broody, either, even though 'everyone' says they are good broodies! I did have a Buff Wyandotte go broody, though, and strongly suspect she had some Buff Orpington in her ancestry, because she had white skin and legs (Wyandottes are supposed to have yellow skin). I think I got the Buff Wyandottes from Privett hatchery, but you'd have to check and see if they still sell them.

    I've had several Easter Eggers go broody, even though the breed descriptions usually say they won't. One of the best broodies I've had was half Easter Egger and half Silkie, and then her daughter, who was 3/4 EE, was also a good broody hen. The crosses will have a bit of feathering on their legs, but they don't have feathered feet like Silkies do. I don't know if the crosses will always have normal feathers, but mine did, and I think that's preferable -- they handle weather better, and I think it's also helpful for covering a clutch of eggs. Both of my cross hens were about half-way in size between a Silkie and Easter Egger, and laid small eggs (but not tiny).

    Right now I've got Icelandics, and have had several of them go broody; the fact that they go broody was one of the main reasons I decided to get Icies, because they are also good layers.

    Personally I don't care much for the feather-footed chickens, because in snow they get ice balls on their feet, and in mud they are just a mess and have to be kept inside (and I prefer my chickens to be free-range as much as possible). But in some situations they are fine, they just take a little more care.
     
    bigz1983 likes this.
  10. bigz1983

    bigz1983 Songster

    385
    338
    171
    Aug 9, 2016
    Michigan
    I wonder if I should look for heritage breeder stock Wyndottes or Dominics?
    If I could find Wyndottes or Dominics bred to have the broody gene and meet my requirements rose comb, dual purpose, clean legged(no leg feathers)I think it would be worth the investment...
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: