Broody

Bawilde

In the Brooder
Nov 20, 2020
3
3
11
I have a Silky that has been broody for about 4 days. We have no rooster. Will she get over this eventually?
 

Fluffs_flock

Songster
Aug 26, 2020
250
979
168
Probably after the 21 days it would take to hatch an egg, but maybe more. My chicken stayed broody for over a month.
The best way to get rid of broodiness is to cool down her body temp, a cold bath will do the trick. Dry her off fast, you don't want her to get too cold, I wouldn't do it at all if it is very cold.
 

rosemarythyme

Scarborough Fair
Premium Feather Member
5 Years
Jul 3, 2016
17,888
35,852
1,062
WA, Pac NW
My Coop
My Coop
Eventually... most likely. But they'll lose weight and body condition from sitting, so is that worth having them set for no reward at the end of the period?

IMO best to break them promptly if you don't plan on hatching/buying chicks.

Put her in an isolation cage with some food and water, in sight of the others (in the coop if it's not too hot or in/near the run is ideal). A wire cage elevated to air flow under her would be the best option, however I've used everything from a brooder to a dog exercise pen.

Keep her in the cage around the clock for about 2 days. At that time, if she's shows fewer signs of broodiness (puffing up, flattening down and growling, tik tik tik noise) you can let her out to test her. If she runs back to the nest at any point (usually they don't do it immediately, but maybe after 15 minutes, maybe an hour) then she's not yet sufficiently broken and needs to go back to the cage for another 24 hours. Then let her out and test her again. Repeat until she's no longer going to the nest box.

IF the isolation cage is not safe for overnight stay (i.e. sits outside the run) then put her on the roost at night, and retrieve her from the nest box the next morning and put her back in the cage. It may take a little longer this way but better than letting a predator get to her.
 

Mariella posey

Songster
Apr 29, 2020
153
330
116
Some hens don't stop unless you make them. One of my Buff Orpington hens went missing and we found her on an empty nest 42 days after she went missing. She didn't make it because she was severely dehydrated and was all skin and bones. Now any time a hens goes missing we find her right away and don't wait to see if she comes back with a new brood.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
9 Years
Nov 27, 2012
100,763
144,185
1,867
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
Eventually... most likely. But they'll lose weight and body condition from sitting, so is that worth having them set for no reward at the end of the period?

IMO best to break them promptly if you don't plan on hatching/buying chicks.

Put her in an isolation cage with some food and water, in sight of the others (in the coop if it's not too hot or in/near the run is ideal). A wire cage elevated to air flow under her would be the best option, however I've used everything from a brooder to a dog exercise pen.

Keep her in the cage around the clock for about 2 days. At that time, if she's shows fewer signs of broodiness (puffing up, flattening down and growling, tik tik tik noise) you can let her out to test her. If she runs back to the nest at any point (usually they don't do it immediately, but maybe after 15 minutes, maybe an hour) then she's not yet sufficiently broken and needs to go back to the cage for another 24 hours. Then let her out and test her again. Repeat until she's no longer going to the nest box.

IF the isolation cage is not safe for overnight stay (i.e. sits outside the run) then put her on the roost at night, and retrieve her from the nest box the next morning and put her back in the cage. It may take a little longer this way but better than letting a predator get to her.
This^^^

Here's a visual:
1605971300956.png
 

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