Bumblefoot in Cochin Rooster's Toe

Redhead Rae

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I don't get a chance to get my hands on my birds often, but today I was separating out some cockerels and banding some pullets and I got my hands on my Black Cochin Rooster. I checked him over and saw that he has bumble foot in one of his toes, or I'm assuming it is bumble foot. I picked at a whitish spot on the top of his toe and a little blood mixed with puss came out. I'm assuming I should keep him separated in a clean area (he is impossible to catch unless I catch him in the mobile coop first thing in the morning) and treat his foot for a few days.

I found this instructional article (https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/bumblefoot-treatment.72887/), but I don't have all the items mentioned. I have blu kote, neosporin (if I remember correctly it should be normal neosporin not the pain releif kind), and epsom salt. Would those be good enough. He is GREAT with chicks so I'm thinking of putting him in a kennel inside my coop where I am brooding my Blue Cochin chicks.

How does this look? Do I need to treat him with anything else?
IMG_6964.JPG

Thanks,
 

Eggcessive

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Looking at the picture to me it looks like the tip of his toe including the nail was frostbitten. I would clean it with some betadine or soak it in some warm Epsom salts or soapy water. The white area is healthy skin.
 

Redhead Rae

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Looking at the picture to me it looks like the tip of his toe including the nail was frostbitten. I would clean it with some betadine or soak it in some warm Epsom salts or soapy water. The white area is healthy skin.
Would you keep him separated for ease of treatment? He is hard to get a hold of otherwise.
 

BantyChooks

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I'll get pictures after I finish breakfast.

Since it looks like frostbite, @BantyChooks, how does this look to you?
Agree, that looks like mild frostbite where just the skin of the toe came off. It looks like it's healing quite well, and honestly, I'd put him back in the coop and ignore it. He'll be all better in a month. You can do what Eggcessive said, though, if it makes you feel better. :thumbsup
 

Redhead Rae

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Thanks, I'll put some probadine on it and let him go (My mom has that stuff for her horses). He isn't feeling too bad. He got loose when we were moving his male offspring into the bachelor pad. We found him over by the quarantine pen flirting with the 3 chocolate orp hens I picked up yesterday. I think I'll put him over them (and a few of my buff orps) as soon as quarantine is up. They will make some beautiful, fluffy babies.
 

WVduckchick

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I agree, very mild frostbite. Or somehow the circulation was cut off. I wouldn't bother messing with it, if they were mine.

Mine do occasionally get mud balls caked around their nails, from scratching damp soil, then walking in the dry stuff, and it hardens rock solid. I have to take pliers to break the chunks off! If I miss any, they can build up and cut off the circulation. I had some lav orps that a broody hatched, and I couldn't get near the chicks, and this happened to a couple of them. Looked a lot like your picture (after I broke the mud off)

Also, can't tell for sure in the pic, but are the scales raised any? Just make sure there aren't any scaly mites up in there.
 

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