bumps like warts on my seramas comb

PHILLIP78

Hatching
5 Years
Jan 12, 2015
8
0
7
What to do I noticed a couple days ago a few of my seramas have wart looking bumps all over their comb one of them looks like its swelling over the eye. Help what is this. Disease or Mosquito bites. I am in south Louisiana in the worst of mosquito season.
 

MrsBrooke

Songster
5 Years
Aug 11, 2014
2,658
308
246
Magnolia, Texas
It sounds like it could be Fowl Pox. If it is, there are two kinds - wet and dry. Both are spread by mosquitos, and the dry type will run its course with little to no ill effects, if I understand correctly. The wet pox is more serious and can effect the respiratory system.

Any chance of getting a picture for reference? :)

MrsB
 
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PHILLIP78

Hatching
5 Years
Jan 12, 2015
8
0
7
400
 

Eggcessive

Addict
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Apr 3, 2011
58,858
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southern Ohio
That is dry fowl pox, a virus spread by mosquitoes which lasts 3-4 weeks. It can spread through the flock through fly or mosquito bites, or by scraping the scabs. There is no treatment, but many apply iodine to the scabs to help them dry up. There is a vaccine available for chickens who haven't yet been exposed, and those that get the pox will be immune to it in the future. The worse wet fowl pox can cause lesions inside the mouth and throat that can be life threatening, so I would recommend looking into the chicken's beak.
 

Akrnaf2

The educated Rhino
6 Years
Jul 5, 2014
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Center of Israel
Some times the worts can be a platform for a secondary bacterial infection.
So I think that you should consider some antibiotic treatment as prevention to this potential infection.
( he is in a real mass!)
 

MrsBrooke

Songster
5 Years
Aug 11, 2014
2,658
308
246
Magnolia, Texas
Akrnaf2, I must respectfully disagree.

Treating birds with "preventative" antibiotics creates resistance, and not every antibiotic treats every infection, either.

I never recommend throwing medication at a bird unless you KNOW what you are treating for.

In the case of FP, it's best to keep a sharp eye out for any flock member that appears to be declining in health. THEN you can begin treatment... but, again, ONLY if you KNOW what you are treating for.

If you see anyone become lethargic, quit eating or drinking, go pale in the comb, start wheezing, or have discharge coming from their eyes and/or nostrils, THEN take action. But giving antibiotics to a chicken that doesn't need it will do more harm than good, in my opinion.

MrsB
 
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Akrnaf2

The educated Rhino
6 Years
Jul 5, 2014
16,822
15,042
732
Center of Israel
Akrnaf2, I must respectfully disagree.

Treating birds with "preventative" antibiotics creates resistance, and not every antibiotic treats every infection, either.

I never recommend throwing medication at a bird unless you KNOW what you are treating for.

In the case of FP, it's best to keep a sharp eye out for any flock member that appears to be declining in health. THEN you can begin treatment... but, again, ONLY if you KNOW what you are treating for.

If you see anyone become lethargic, quit eating or drinking, go pale in the comb, start wheezing, or have discharge coming from their eyes and/or nostrils, THEN take action. But giving antibiotics to a chicken that doesn't need it will do more harm than good, in my opinion.

MrsB

Hello to you
Any treatment with antibiotics creat a resistance not only preventative.
To really know what infected your chicken( virus,bacterium, fungi, eukaryotic parasite )you need to do some bacteriological/serological test in a lab and 99.9% of us don't do them! so we almost all the time are guessing in the dark about what infected our chickens.
Basically I agree with you about being coshes with antibiotic, bot in this particular case it seems to me, from the pic. That it is a case when this treatment could reduce the chance for secondary infection.
MrB
 
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