Bunny pee has blood?

Jenessa_096

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Jul 14, 2021
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OK here’s the situation I have two Lionhead bunnies that are both three months old they are inside and are being fed pellets various veggies and alfalfa hay. We think the female is pregnant because about last week when she turned three months old she keeps on trying to make a nest and bringing various items into her hiding house. Today I fed them some beet leaves could it be from that? I tried searching it up in the most common answer is Overrine cancer? Is she too young?
 

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EverythingDucks

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At three months old they should both be separated.

Hopefully she's just having a false pregnancy, and hopefully they aren't both sexualy mature yet. But, rabbits can breed at a very young age and will, so I would go ahead and separate them now.

The red pee is likely not even blood and is just from food pigments.
With how young she is, I doubt she's having any health issues that would cause this, but I would watch her diet, separate them, and see if this continues happening and hope she isn't pregnant.

I'll tag some people here who all have lots of experience with breeding and owning many rabbits.
@NatJ @LizzzyJo @Everose any thoughts?
 

Everose

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OK here’s the situation I have two Lionhead bunnies that are both three months old they are inside and are being fed pellets various veggies and alfalfa hay. We think the female is pregnant because about last week when she turned three months old she keeps on trying to make a nest and bringing various items into her hiding house. Today I fed them some beet leaves could it be from that? I tried searching it up in the most common answer is Overrine cancer? Is she too young?
I think she is far too young for ovarian cancer. I had a doe pee blood once, it was a one time thing and she's just fine now. This doesn't look like blood, it's very dark though. Follow Everything Duck's advice for now, separating them would be wise.

Do you know how to expose the vent? If you know how can you tell us if it's pink or white?
How much does your doe weigh? Do you want kits?
 
Last edited:

NatJ

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At three months old they should both be separated.

Hopefully she's just having a false pregnancy, and hopefully they aren't both sexualy mature yet. But, rabbits can breed at a very young age and will, so I would go ahead and separate them now.
...
I'll tag some people here who all have lots of experience with breeding and owning many rabbits.
@NatJ
I just responded in OP's other thread, but I'll copy it here too:

Okay also I’m pretty sure my bunny is pregnant! They turned 3 months old a week ago and she is showing signs of pregnancy. She is gathering a bunch of blankets and pieces of stuff and toys into her little bed. I have noticed my male he was trying to jump on her is it possible for her to be pregnant?
YES. Given what you describe, she probably is pregnant, although it would have been better for her to grow up a bit more first.

I suggest you separate the two of them for at least 35 days (that would be sometime in the middle of January.) Adjacent pens, with wire mesh between them so they can still sniff and socialize, would probably be best. The idea is to prevent mating, but not separate them far enough to be lonely. And no playtime together-- none at all, if you want to prevent mating.

Definitely make sure she has a safe place to give birth: maybe a wood nestbox and lots of hay or straw to burrow in. The box can also be metal, plastic, or probably even cardboard, but the doe definitely needs plenty of hay or straw to make her nest. The opening should be high enough that jumps up and in, rather than walking in straight. That helps keep the bunnies IN the box while they are little-- so a top opening, or one partway up on one side.

A rabbit pregnancy usually lasts 31 days, so within about 35 days from separating them you should know for sure. Having the male separate ensures that he will not breed the doe (if she is not pregnant yet), does not trample babies when they are born, and does not rebreed the doe after she gives birth. Yes, a male rabbit can rebreed the doe before you even know the babies have been born, if he is in the same pen with her.

Then, if she has not yet had a litter, think about whether you ever want them to breed. If yes, make your plans and act accordingly.

If you know already that you do not want them to breed, you can have the male neutered now, and the doe spayed after she raises the litter, or if you discover that she wasn't pregnant you can have her spayed after enough time passes that you are sure of that.
 

Jenessa_096

Crowing
Jul 14, 2021
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Molalla, Oregon
I just responded in OP's other thread, but I'll copy it here too:


YES. Given what you describe, she probably is pregnant, although it would have been better for her to grow up a bit more first.

I suggest you separate the two of them for at least 35 days (that would be sometime in the middle of January.) Adjacent pens, with wire mesh between them so they can still sniff and socialize, would probably be best. The idea is to prevent mating, but not separate them far enough to be lonely. And no playtime together-- none at all, if you want to prevent mating.

Definitely make sure she has a safe place to give birth: maybe a wood nestbox and lots of hay or straw to burrow in. The box can also be metal, plastic, or probably even cardboard, but the doe definitely needs plenty of hay or straw to make her nest. The opening should be high enough that jumps up and in, rather than walking in straight. That helps keep the bunnies IN the box while they are little-- so a top opening, or one partway up on one side.

A rabbit pregnancy usually lasts 31 days, so within about 35 days from separating them you should know for sure. Having the male separate ensures that he will not breed the doe (if she is not pregnant yet), does not trample babies when they are born, and does not rebreed the doe after she gives birth. Yes, a male rabbit can rebreed the doe before you even know the babies have been born, if he is in the same pen with her.

Then, if she has not yet had a litter, think about whether you ever want them to breed. If yes, make your plans and act accordingly.

If you know already that you do not want them to breed, you can have the male neutered now, and the doe spayed after she raises the litter, or if you discover that she wasn't pregnant you can have her spayed after enough time passes that you are sure of that.
I DO want them to have babies so that’s not the problem, also we scheduled an appointment for the rabbit neuter in March when he will be 6 months old. We will probably spay the girl later that year because it is more expensive.
 

Jenessa_096

Crowing
Jul 14, 2021
1,271
2,590
286
Molalla, Oregon
I think she is far too young for ovarian cancer. I had a doe pee blood once, it was a one time thing and she's just fine now. This doesn't look like blood, it's very dark though. Follow Everything Duck's advice for now, separating them would be wise.

Do you know how to expose the vent? If you know how can you tell us if it's pink or white?
How much does your doe weigh? Do you want kits?
Why would I separate them? Also I don’t know how much she weighs but yes I do want kits.
 

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