Bwana Kisumu Chicken of Uganda and Kenya

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Resolution, Dec 17, 2010.

  1. Resolution

    Resolution Chillin' With My Peeps

    A recent paper on the genetic origins and interrelationships of native chickens of East Africa revealed that
    there is a surprising amount of genetic diversity amongst native fowls of East Africa.


    No one is certain just when chickens arrived in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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    The giant Comoros Isles Junglefowl with their naked necks and curious crests were present in Madagascar as early as 200 A.D. Austronesians carried this -what is probably an actual species not a breed- all over Oceania and the Pacific. Any naked neck chicken accrued the trait from this giant island race or species. There may have been two different races of the same species on two different island in the Comoros.


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    Ancient Bigawi fowl of Upper Egypt were established in the Aksumite Kingdom of Ethiopia by the 4th Century A.D.. The trio pictured here are of the "Cinnamon" phenotype. This what "Fayoumi" look like in the Red Sea Hills and Upper (Southern Egypt) where the soil is dark. Light coloured hens come from where the substrate is white sand. There is a third form from Qena Egypt where the females are leaden grey- very much like the female Buana chicken.



    Subsequent importations of Asil from western India and Cochin fowl from southern China were a composite stock common in Asiatic communities of South Africa, Uganda, Kenya and Somalia for over a century. This group of typically Asiatic and Indian races we'll set aside for a moment to focus on characteristically African breeds.

    Chickens are amongst the most valuable livestock species for many rural village communities. Native breeds are few and far between. Very few are common. Specific regions have their own unique breeds of fowl and it's puzzling to me how African breeds, save for the Fayoumi and Madagascar Games are virtually unknown outside of Europe and Africa.

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    My personal favorite the Bwana Kisumu Chicken of Uganda and Kenya is the focus of this thread.

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    In very recent times, British Colonialists farmed Dorking fowl somewhat intensively. Thousands of top quality Dorkings were imported into Kenya and Uganda at least two or three times a year.


    A century or two later and descendants of the British Dorking have interbred extensively with the Bigawi X Malagasy composite, by then, already well established in East Africa. The birds are colorful and lively- somehow capable of avoiding predation even though they are big bodied birds.
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    Last edited: Dec 18, 2010
    1 person likes this.
  2. pinkchick

    pinkchick "Ain't nuttin' like having da' blues"

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    Thank You Res! Such a pleasure to read your posts. Can't wait for more on these beauties.......[​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  3. Hi! I want to see these:
    The giant Comoros Isles Junglefowl with their naked necks and curious crests were present in Madagascar as early as 200 A.D.

    [​IMG]
    Lisa​
     
  4. Resolution

    Resolution Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:[​IMG]
    Lisa

    Hi Lisa,

    I've posted the photos in the original post.

    peaz and beans
     
  5. awesomefowl

    awesomefowl Argues with Goats

    Wow!
     
  6. Hi! That's most peculiar --- the only pic that showed before was this one:
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    I see the Naked Neck pic (and others) now.
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    I'm not seeing what they call a "curious crest", though.
    [​IMG]
    Lisa
     
  7. Resolution

    Resolution Chillin' With My Peeps

    some birds have more feathers on their cheeks -especially hens and a little bushy crest- thats long in the back. I suspect this roosre's crest was eaten off by the hen.
     
  8. usschicago1

    usschicago1 Suburban Cochins

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    Great Thread ! [​IMG]
     
  9. easttxchick

    easttxchick Lone Star Call Ducks

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    Fantastic information!
    Thanks for sharing the pictures and the history of these birds.


    "The giant Comoros Isles Junglefowl with their naked necks and curious crests were present in Madagascar as early as 200 A.D. Austronesians carried this -what is probably an actual species not a breed- all over Oceania and the Pacific. Any naked neck chicken accrued the trait from this giant island race or species. There may have been two different races of the same species on two different island in the Comoros."

    While I could go look this up myself, I'm going to be lazy and ask you to define what is meant here by "giant" in reference to your typical backyard chicken? The pictures don't offer much in the way of point of reference to determine size(or is the term "giant" referring to their very early predecessors?).
    I'm weirdly fascinated(and perhaps a bit terrified) at the idea of a giant naked-neck chicken. [​IMG]

    ETA: Never mind-did a little research and found out I'm asking a question about an extinct bird(slight embarrassment). However, my fears are not without merit-they were GIANT, scary naked-neck extinct chickens.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2010
  10. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    The naked necked ones don't have a "curious crest" I think Resolution is referring to the normal "cap" of feathers on their head.

    Resolution, a really interesting thing to delve into and involving those naked necks is the Malgache, or Madagascar Gamefowl. They're from Madagascar and have a lot of, if not purely, gamefowl influence. They're naked necked like Turkens, but quite upright, meaty, and with a lot of "fierce" expression and a dewlap. And, of course, they are bred for fighting.

    (
    Not my birds
    )

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