California - Northern

Lynn Manes

Songster
5 Years
Mar 18, 2015
885
139
167
California
That's fantastic Rae. Have fun raising your meal worm colony and watching your flock enjoy the fruits of your labor. When I want my flock to head back into the coop, I entice them with meal worms. Unfortunately, we just lost our entire colony of meal worms due to too must humidity in the box, a mistake I made; but we'll be starting a new colony in a couple of days-not however with as many as you started with. Our flocks are small- 6 chickens, 6 ducks, 3 geese and right now about 20 quail. So my birds all got used to the big red bag of dried meal worms we buy at TSC, and they now recognize that bag. My little Cortinix quail get to excited that they all crowd to the pen door and so many times, inevitably one or two fall out trying to be sure they are first in line for the yummy treats. Thankfully they are easily picked up and placed back in the pen to enjoy those worms. We did not throw the dead ones away, bc the fowl love them and the beetles anyway. Once our new colony grows enough to feed the birds, I'll have to be sure to keep one of those red bags. Is so funny to learn about these little things that make them all so happy:)
 

chiqita

Crowing
8 Years
Aug 29, 2011
5,430
181
268
San Jose, Ca
she didn't seam smashed, but her neck was very flimsy for being dead, the other one was very stiff, so i think that is what happend. but she also had alot of stuff stuck to her butt.

This time of year when they have drastic temp changes can encourage poopy butt.

Make sure they have access to chick grit and the bedding is warm.
 

PetRock

Crowing
10 Years
Apr 28, 2010
4,920
340
326
Camino, CA
This time of year when they have drastic temp changes can encourage poopy butt.

Make sure they have access to chick grit and the bedding is warm.
I had lots of broody raised chicks this summer and a few had poop butts. Chasing around free ranging broody raised chicks in order to clean their butts is lots of fun! A few of them required a couple cleanings but I only lost one. The problem seems to happen in the first week or two of life. I've read that putting ground up oatmeal on their feed helps. I've never tried it. I usually just clean them off and, after a time or two, the problem goes away. With my chicks in the brooder, I've noticed that having the brooder too warm seems to contribute to the problem.
 

ronott1

A chicken will always remember the egg
Project Manager
Premium Feather Member
9 Years
Mar 31, 2011
66,586
182,869
1,982
Woodland, CA
My Coop
My Coop
I had lots of broody raised chicks this summer and a few had poop butts. Chasing around free ranging broody raised chicks in order to clean their butts is lots of fun! A few of them required a couple cleanings but I only lost one. The problem seems to happen in the first week or two of life. I've read that putting ground up oatmeal on their feed helps. I've never tried it. I usually just clean them off and, after a time or two, the problem goes away. With my chicks in the brooder, I've noticed that having the brooder too warm seems to contribute to the problem.
It is caused by stress--If they hatch hard, are shipped. It seems everyone blames temperature but that is only one cause.

If a chick has a hard time hatching, I can guarantee it will get pasty butt.
 

Granny368W

Chirping
Jun 14, 2015
557
32
88
That's fantastic Rae. Have fun raising your meal worm colony and watching your flock enjoy the fruits of your labor. When I want my flock to head back into the coop, I entice them with meal worms. Unfortunately, we just lost our entire colony of meal worms due to too must humidity in the box, a mistake I made; but we'll be starting a new colony in a couple of days-not however with as many as you started with. Our flocks are small- 6 chickens, 6 ducks, 3 geese and right now about 20 quail. So my birds all got used to the big red bag of dried meal worms we buy at TSC, and they now recognize that bag. My little Cortinix quail get to excited that they all crowd to the pen door and so many times, inevitably one or two fall out trying to be sure they are first in line for the yummy treats. Thankfully they are easily picked up and placed back in the pen to enjoy those worms. We did not throw the dead ones away, bc the fowl love them and the beetles anyway. Once our new colony grows enough to feed the birds, I'll have to be sure to keep one of those red bags. Is so funny to learn about these little things that make them all so happy:)


Lynn, I'm sorry you lost your worm farm... that's one good thing for me is up here its really dry... so I don't have to worry about humidity... it is so much fun watching them,I've fed them the freeze dried ones and they liked them BUT not like they love these live ones! lol I think my one hen that looks like she'll lay first, squatted for me.... so I'm really excited thinking I should get an egg soon... good grief, they are 23 weeks old... Rae
 

PetRock

Crowing
10 Years
Apr 28, 2010
4,920
340
326
Camino, CA
It is caused by stress--If they hatch hard, are shipped. It seems everyone blames temperature but that is only one cause.

If a chick has a hard time hatching, I can guarantee it will get pasty butt.
That's interesting. I'll have to mark them and keep an eye on them. I've been much more hands off with hatching this year and it is going much better. My crazy Hovabator has not been keeping constant temps for me. It might be that my house is just too hot but I'm having to adjust it often through the day. So, I've been incubating in it and then setting the eggs for hatch in my Brinsea. My current Langshan hatch is winding down. Out of 13 eggs, I have 10 chicks, 1 that is zipping, and 2 that haven't pipped. It was day 21 last night so there is still a chance for the last 2. I'm very pleased with the Brinsea but I wish that it help more eggs!
wink.png
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom