Can a chicken poop out it's liver?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by toughwuss, Sep 29, 2014.

  1. toughwuss

    toughwuss New Egg

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    Sep 29, 2014
    Hey, odd question, but I got up this morning and went out to feed the flock, and noticed one of my girls comb was folded over, knew something must be off, went over to her and then noticed blood dripping down her back side... I initially thought she had been in a fight but looked closer and it appeared to be coming from her vent, and so I initially thought prolapsed vent, as I believe all my hens were vaccinated (or medicated) as chicks for Coccidiosis... I brought her in, cleaned her up and soaked her in a epson salt bath, and dried her and put her in a dog crate, a few hours later I check on her again and I see this off poop in the back of the kennel, its got part semi-normal looking poop (within range anyway), then had a pretty squared off (somewhat rounded square) liver looking thing in it... i brought it out and forgot to take a pic at first, but started to dig into it, and that piece was VERY much like a liver, NOT like coagulated blood as far as I can tell... I basically cut into it and it cut like liver and everything... its very crazy.... no crazy blood (irony smell) or bad smell at all really... shes still in the kennel, resting, willl drink a little if I put her beak to the water, and the same if I put her beak to the food... but still very much noticibly ill... do you think this could be Coccidiosis? any ideas? none of the other girls are showing these symptoms...

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  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    The liver isn't inside the digestive tract so no.
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC. How old is this chicken? Have you added new birds recently? Yes, I think that was a large chunk of a blood clot or intestinal tissue that sloughed off. I would go out this evening ASAP and get Corid (amprollium) or Ampromed. If the liquid is available, it is easier to take a couple of undiluted drops and start it. Dosage is 2 tsp of the liquid or 1.5 tsp of the powder per gallon of water s the only water source for 5-7 days. Afterward treat with vitamins and probiotics for several days. Even if this turns out to not be cocci, it would be safer to treat for it since Corid is safe.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2014
  4. toughwuss

    toughwuss New Egg

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    Sep 29, 2014
    1.5 years old, no new birds, same flock together their whole lives...
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    A friend of mine on here just had a necropsy done on her 4 year old silkie who was diagnosed with coccidiosis, enteritis, and cecal worms which all can cause bleeding in the intestines. Cocci can lead to enteritis, but cecal worms usually has to be diagnosed with a fecal test by a vet. Corid treats cocci, amoxicillin helps treat enteritis, and cecal worms are treated by fenbendazole (SafeGuard Liquid Goat Wormer) 1 ml (for standard sized chickens) given orally undiluted 5 days in a row. For bantams, I would reduce the dosage to 1/2 ml. Here is a link about enteritis: http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/101/necrotic-enteritis
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2014

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