Can pullets crow?

twinklemama

In the Brooder
8 Years
Nov 21, 2011
47
0
34
I just got a new batch of chickens this Spring 10 are Easter Eggers and the other 24 are Cinnamon Queen (brown layers). They arrived March 11th so they are just a few days short of 8 weeks. I went to open the coop this morning and to my surprise I hear 1 of the chickens crow!!! So I guess my question is, do pullets sometimes crow? It happened twice and stopped. I can't tell which one it is as of yet and I don't see any features that make me think rooster, though I know there is a fail rate on sexing chickens. I think it may be an Easter Egger but their colors are so varied I don't have what to look for. We are not set up for roosters here yet and if 1 is a rooster I want to get him out and away from my mature hens.
 

Ol Grey Mare

One egg shy of a full carton. .....
7 Years
Mar 9, 2014
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I just got a new batch of chickens this Spring 10 are Easter Eggers and the other 24 are Cinnamon Queen (brown layers). They arrived March 11th so they are just a few days short of 8 weeks. I went to open the coop this morning and to my surprise I hear 1 of the chickens crow!!! So I guess my question is, do pullets sometimes crow? It happened twice and stopped. I can't tell which one it is as of yet and I don't see any features that make me think rooster, though I know there is a fail rate on sexing chickens. I think it may be an Easter Egger but their colors are so varied I don't have what to look for. We are not set up for roosters here yet and if 1 is a rooster I want to get him out and away from my mature hens.

The short answer is - no - pullets/young females do not crow. *some* female chickens will crow, but these are older, mature hens who usually have hormonal imbalances at play. A bird who is crowing at 8 weeks is a male bird.
If you post photos of the birds we can help you spot the culprit.
 

junebuggena

Crowing
Apr 17, 2015
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Long Beach, WA
A good way to spot a young rooster is to look at the comb. Any bird under 10 weeks old with a bright pink/red comb is a rooster. Color of the comb is more important than the size of the comb.
 

Ol Grey Mare

One egg shy of a full carton. .....
7 Years
Mar 9, 2014
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If they are pea combed EE a quick method is to look at the number of rows the comb is showing - 3 distinct rows = male. There are also some generally pullet/generally cockerel color patterns that occur in EE (ie brick red patchy coloration on the shoulders = male).
 

twinklemama

In the Brooder
8 Years
Nov 21, 2011
47
0
34
Pretty sure this is it. Only 1 with a reddened or developed comb. I can get a better pic if needed.
 

twinklemama

In the Brooder
8 Years
Nov 21, 2011
47
0
34
A good way to spot a young rooster is to look at the comb. Any bird under 10 weeks old with a bright pink/red comb is a rooster. Color of the comb is more important than the size of the comb.
400

pretty positive this is the culprit, only 1 with a developed comb. I can get a better pic if needed.
1000
 
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twinklemama

In the Brooder
8 Years
Nov 21, 2011
47
0
34
He is the ONLY 1 that shows a comb that is anything but yellow still. A little sad but thunking I can find a home for him so I can still use him for breeding when I want.
 

Ol Grey Mare

One egg shy of a full carton. .....
7 Years
Mar 9, 2014
20,622
15,066
821
Oregon
My Coop
My Coop
He is the ONLY 1 that shows a comb that is anything but yellow still. A little sad but thunking I can find a home for him so I can still use him for breeding when I want.

I would be hesitant to try to arrange such a system with his new home - because whether you are thinking you could take hens to him or bring him to your hens at those times there are some serious bio-security concerns even if the other party is someone you know well, trust and have similar husbandry practices. There are risks to both flocks as diseases can be easily carried back and forth and you could end up having a disastrous outcome for you and the person that you have given the roo to.
Also you would have the issue of the fact that any hatches you have would likely produce more cockerels that you can't/don't want to keep - what would be your plan for those birds?
 
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