Can you show the "splash" color at the 4-h level?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by tls_ranch, May 19, 2009.

  1. tls_ranch

    tls_ranch Stares at Chickens

    I want to give a few splash Orpington cockerels to a 4-h er as a poultry project and maybe to show at our local fairs. I don't know much about showing, but I think the splash color isn't always an "accepted" color. I bought 6 strait run blue/splash Orpingtons and Wyandottes from a local breeder. Just my luck, 5 of the 6 chicks are roos! [​IMG] I already gave another 4-h er the blue wyandotte cockerels. Can a 4-h er show splash Orpington roos?
     
  2. LilPeeps

    LilPeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 13, 2007
    SE Mass
    Only buff, black, white and blue orps are recognized. You can show the splash, just enter them as AOV. 4H shows aren't really based on breed standards, it's more about merit than anything else. If you go to a sanctioned show, they'll have a junior class where they birds will be judged to the standard by a licensed judge.
     
  3. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    Sep 14, 2008
    Adair Co., KY
    Quote:That's crazy, why is splash not recognized? How do they expect you to get blue ones if there are no splashes to start with? [​IMG]
     
  4. tls_ranch

    tls_ranch Stares at Chickens

    I too think that it is unfair to not accept splashes, because it's part of the genetic pattern of B/B/S.
     
  5. LilPeeps

    LilPeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 13, 2007
    SE Mass
    Quote:That's crazy, why is splash not recognized? How do they expect you to get blue ones if there are no splashes to start with? [​IMG]

    It's not easy to get a variety recognized, they're not just accepted because they're a common byproduct of breeding recognized varieties. I believe that in order to get a new breed or variety recognized, the breed/variety applying for recognition must have specimens shown at least twice per year for two years, and on each occasion, at least 2 cocks, 2 hens, 2 cockerels, and 2 pullets must be shown. A qualifying meet is then held (for which a fee must be payed) where no less than 50 birds of that breed or variety must be shown by 5 or more breeders having bred for at least 5 years. There must be a standard by which the judge can go by and the birds must breed true. If the judges agree, they can then be accepted into the standard.

    Quote:It has nothing to do with fairness, it's whether or not breeders are willing to put fourth the effort to get the variety accepted.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2009

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