Cattle?

Overthinker

Chirping
Sep 26, 2021
104
136
86
Thanks, shouldn't i have more than one cause they heard animal? We could get goat friends maybe, any benefit or are goats just pets?
 

Folly's place

Enabler
10 Years
Sep 13, 2011
24,341
42,782
1,156
southern Michigan
Cattle do need herdmates, and goats would be better than nothing. Pick carefully, don't get one from an infected herd. Temperament matters a lot! A small young steer will weigh in at 1000 lbs, so learn first how to manage one or more.
See if you can visit and spend time at a farm with cattle, don't just leap into this blind.
Mary
 

Mrskrieg77357

Chirping
Jul 21, 2020
34
57
64
I can elaborate a little bit more on our experience too. Our first cow we got she was 1 year old. We had her for about 6 months before we took her to butcher. We did jump into it as some would say “blindly” but we also watched YouTube and researched what we needed to. We also raise out pigs and found it to be way easier than pigs to be honest. She may have been a herd animal but she had a couple goats and they were buddies and played together all the time. Two cows would probably be enough I would start slow and not get like a million cows to start with you know?? Our second cow we got was like 6 months old and we have him now for when run out of beef we will take him to butcher. We never like tested our soil or anything extreme like that? Idk how getting any from an infected head I guess we got lucky *shoulder shrug* but we get our off Craigslist and look at them and make sure they dont act sick and look good them you’ll be all good! I would probably invest in a trailer so you can take your animals to the butcher and maybe if it’s not harnessed trained from a baby be really careful about getting in the pen with it if it’s not too tame
 

Folly's place

Enabler
10 Years
Sep 13, 2011
24,341
42,782
1,156
southern Michigan
Buying a calf at auction would not be a good way to start, those pens can be petri dishes of every respiratory virus, at least.
Get a calf from a tested herd that's been well cared for, and work with him while he's smaller, don't wait for him to be big! And if he's not already castrated, schedule that soonest, preferably with your veterinarian.
We've had nice individuals, and a couple of jerks, who were 'tricky', meaning dangerous.
Mary
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom