Chicken cuddling?

Amben

Chirping
Oct 21, 2015
17
4
54
Has anyone ever had a chick try and "cuddle" with them? I picked up a chick (I also just brought them into the big coop, with adult birds). The chick was perched on my hand, fluttered onto my shoulder, kinda like buried it's beak in my hair (kinda like grooming?) crawled under my pony tail then did the same thing on the other side.
If it were a dog it was like how dogs wipe their faces on you.

I guess I'm just shocked at the "friendliness," I've been trying to handle the chicks more but didn't think I was handling them enough. So is it cuddling or something else?
 

PD-Riverman

Crowing
8 Years
Jan 14, 2012
5,007
1,302
406
Conway SC
Some chicks just get attached to their Humans---It happens a lot with me----a special chick in just about every pen. Be careful with the chicks with the adults-----one peck from a hen can kill them.
 

Amben

Chirping
Oct 21, 2015
17
4
54
They're a little over six weeks, and I've got a lot of hiding places for 'em ;)

Glad to hear it's cuddling though
 

NotSoChickenLove

Chirping
Jun 1, 2017
113
76
76
NZ
Cuddling is just looking for warmth and security, though, isn't it? It probably doesn't even register you as one distinct organism. As far as the chick's concerned there's food-hands, warm bits, noise-maker etc, all sorts of creatures in it's world, and they're all you!
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
23,755
34,238
1,122
Colorado Rockies
Cuddling is just looking for warmth and security, though, isn't it? It probably doesn't even register you as one distinct organism. As far as the chick's concerned there's food-hands, warm bits, noise-maker etc, all sorts of creatures in it's world, and they're all you!
Probably. But there is also an element of inter-species bonding.

Some individuals are more inclined to bond with you than others, a combo of breeding and temperament. All of these individuals have a throw-back instinct in common - wanting to snuggle under anything that resembles a broody hen's closeness and warmth.

These chickens will retain this inclination for life. I have a nine-year old Brahma that still blisses out in my arms with her head tucked securely under my chin. At ten pounds, she's a real lap-full, but I'm sure she thinks she's still a chick.
 

lazy gardener

Crossing the Road
7 Years
Nov 7, 2012
27,615
27,023
917
CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
Cuddling is just looking for warmth and security, though, isn't it? It probably doesn't even register you as one distinct organism. As far as the chick's concerned there's food-hands, warm bits, noise-maker etc, all sorts of creatures in it's world, and they're all you!

Probably. But there is also an element of inter-species bonding.

Some individuals are more inclined to bond with you than others, a combo of breeding and temperament. All of these individuals have a throw-back instinct in common - wanting to snuggle under anything that resembles a broody hen's closeness and warmth.

These chickens will retain this inclination for life. I have a nine-year old Brahma that still blisses out in my arms with her head tucked securely under my chin. At ten pounds, she's a real lap-full, but I'm sure she thinks she's still a chick.

I believe that chickens definitely know certain humans and other species that they interact with. My chicks all come on the run when they see me. They don't do so when they see other family members. Some breeds are apt to be more friendly. I peg Dominique in that category, and am now inclined to include Plymouth Barred Rock. At least one of my Dom chicks will ALWAYS stand on my foot, and beg to get picked up. One of the PBR chicks also seeks out extra attention from me. Some chicks will lay on their backs in my hands and close their eyes while I give them a facial massage. Chickens are far more intelligent than most folks give them credit for.
 

NotSoChickenLove

Chirping
Jun 1, 2017
113
76
76
NZ
I believe that chickens definitely know certain humans and other species that they interact with. My chicks all come on the run when they see me. They don't do so when they see other family members. Some breeds are apt to be more friendly. I peg Dominique in that category, and am now inclined to include Plymouth Barred Rock. At least one of my Dom chicks will ALWAYS stand on my foot, and beg to get picked up. One of the PBR chicks also seeks out extra attention from me. Some chicks will lay on their backs in my hands and close their eyes while I give them a facial massage. Chickens are far more intelligent than most folks give them credit for.

Yours sound a bit smarter than mine. Mine run to greet the food scoop. If I put down the food scoop, they will stay with the food scoop. They love the food scoop. I can get the same response if I have no food scoop but a handful of mealworms. They will run over and greet the cat, though. Might because he hasn't turned them upside down to look at vents and pinbones and suchlike.
 

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