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(Chicken got a cold?) Added Info.(MS/MG,ILT,CRD,NPIP)

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by spook, Dec 18, 2008.

  1. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Quote:I do not believe this for one second. They absolutely cannot know this unless they have tested 75-90% of all backyard flocks in the U.S. ....

    If a sufficiently random and sufficiently large enough sample of backyard flocks have been tested and rates varied between 75-90%, then it can be extrapolated to cover all flocks. Getting a sufficiently random and large enough sample does seem like it would be difficult, however.
     
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I agree, a large enough sampling couldnt have possibly have been taken to extrapolate the statement that was made. And I think it will make people lax about their biosecurity efforts, thinking there is no way to escape the disease anyway. I realize how they come to those numbers, generally, but I completely disagree with the figure they are giving, especially the top number. No way will I believe that. It may, however, become a sort of self-fulfilling prophecy if folks just allow illness to take hold in their flocks.
     
  3. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    It would be interesting to know how they derived their sample. Easiest way would be testing at shows, but that excludes a huge portion of backyard flocks. Also, if much of the testing was in one geographic region, it would be invalid as an overall sufficiently random sample as all populations need to be considered.

    If they tested in addition to NPIP (just to gather statistics), it would exclude those who are not. Many of the western states have no legislated requirement for any testing for any reason.
     
  4. crazyhen

    crazyhen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I can't beleive that either. I did have the state test mine on request from me for Microplasms, viruses ,Pyllorum etc. I have the test results back myself. They do not require anything but pylorrum and virus testing to be npip certified. Having said that I do not sell any birds at this time or eggs. I have neighbors who are not the most respondsible at keeping their birds in and I hope and pray they do not bring disease here. Their roos and hens do get out. I have mine in a run but even then it is possible. The tester told me to spray clorox at a high concentration around the fences and where I walk in. A biproduct of that is less odor where there is run off from the run. I do occ. also get new chicks from a non npip person.. He sort of grumbles but checks them completely as per my request. I have never had a problem because it is just from one I know well.
    I also would like to know how they got their samples. Unless you ask they don't test. You think maybe some called who had sick chicks and the sample was lopsided? gloria Jean
     
  5. robin416

    robin416 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 6, 2007
    Quote:I do not believe this for one second. They absolutely cannot know this unless they have tested 75-90% of all backyard flocks in the U.S. ....

    If a sufficiently random and sufficiently large enough sample of backyard flocks have been tested and rates varied between 75-90%, then it can be extrapolated to cover all flocks. Getting a sufficiently random and large enough sample does seem like it would be difficult, however.

    They got those numbers in the same way they are putting together the incidences of AI in our flocks. By testing for it at the same time they did the NPIP tests. When you think of the thousands who do participate in the NPIP program its pretty easy to get a good snap shot of the numbers out there.
     
  6. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    My issue is that many who are NPIP also show their birds and are exposing them to so much more than many regular backyard flock owners do. That may skew the numbers quite a bit, IMO. Whatever the numbers actually are, that is no excuse for people to be so lax with their flock management. If you don't at least try to keep disease out, you won't keep it out, right?
     
  7. robin416

    robin416 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 6, 2007
    As noted in the early going MS/MG is every where. Think of it in the same way we think of cocci, its there, be aware of it and deal with it if there's a problem. I am not going to lock my birds in a building so I can feel better about them not coming in to contact where a wild bird has been. That would be the only way to eradicate it from our birds.

    Chickens have been a major part of my life for some time now. I have never had a problem with MS/MG. My birds are not locked down, I do not practice an all in/all out as far as my birds are concerned. And I have a healthy flock. But they might still test positive. I don't sweat it since there is nothing that can truly be done to prevent it other than to keep doing what I'm doing. Keeping my coops clean, my waterers fresh, the best feed I can buy and fresh air.

    As to testing, ask about how often there are false negatives and false positives. That is a problem very often in testing.

    As far as taking birds to shows and exposing them. For the most part those birds are in better condition and healthier than many back yard flocks because of the constant care and attention those birds get.

    I know of two flocks that had to be destroyed because of ILT, neither of these flock owners had been showing their birds. The source for both flocks is not absolutely known but the birds contracted it any way. Both flocks were highly maintained but in different ways. One was allowed out door access, one was not.

    We can lose the joy we have in keeping birds worrying about all of the wrong things.
     
  8. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I don't sweat it since there is nothing that can truly be done to prevent it other than to keep doing what I'm doing. Keeping my coops clean, my waterers fresh, the best feed I can buy and fresh air.

    Me, too, Robin. Just try my best to keep things healthy any way I can. [​IMG] Nobody has to wear a bio suit to come here, contrary to what some may think, LOL. You know me and you know mine receive really good care, but heck, things happen since germs are not visible and can sneak in any number of ways, so nothing is foolproof. I simply want to do what I can to keep the nasties out of the flock. Prevention is so much easier than the heartache of a sick flock, I think you'd agree. [​IMG]
     
  9. robin416

    robin416 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 6, 2007
    Cynthia, I knew you'd understand. That's why I felt confident in saying it. We all know stuff happens no matter how well we keep them, its part of the whole picture with these guys.

    The plus? We're pushing back against vets not treating and more are willing to try treating. I came across a university site a couple of weeks ago that acknowledges the drugs and chemicals we use on our non commercial flocks. They actually listed many of them and what they treated.
     
  10. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    The plus? We're pushing back against vets not treating and more are willing to try treating. I came across a university site a couple of weeks ago that acknowledges the drugs and chemicals we use on our non commercial flocks. They actually listed many of them and what they treated

    That's some positive news! I hope the trend continues.​
     

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