Chicken lost half her skin

mrswalker

Chirping
May 7, 2020
38
172
56
From the OP's description, it sounds like this chicken is doing just fine. As long as she is eating and drinking and acts alert, I would keep treating her. You can always put an animal down if necessary, but I think all this chicken needs is time. I have seen animals recover from some really horrible wounds.
So far, I'm taking it day by day. As long as she's acting normally and not worsening, I plan on giving her time and treatment. If she shows any sign of worsening, at all, I will put her down. But for now she's really acting like a fairly normal injured chicken.
 

mrswalker

Chirping
May 7, 2020
38
172
56
From the OP's description, it sounds like this chicken is doing just fine. As long as she is eating and drinking and acts alert, I would keep treating her. You can always put an animal down if necessary, but I think all this chicken needs is time. I have seen animals recover from some really horrible wounds.
Thank you both for your thoughts. I agree with your assessment of her eyes on the first day, that photo was taken within an hour of getting her home. By the next morning her eyes were perked up and lively again, responsive.
 

mrswalker

Chirping
May 7, 2020
38
172
56
We had a hen who we rescued after she was dumped at the animal shelter following a dog attack. Vetericyn was an absolute hero product to her recovery. We also too used Chlorahex wipes. It took a long time but she recovered, and that’s the most “egg-cited” I’ve ever been to see a bird lay an egg when she finally did, LOL!

You keep your head up and be strong for that beautiful bird, and I’m sending you both well wishes and all the luck for a healthy recovery.
Thank you! I hope we have as positive an outcome as yours did, eggs or no eggs :)
 

mrswalker

Chirping
May 7, 2020
38
172
56
I dont question @azygous wisdom & insight, & it is true that infection sets in when too much skin is lost. (Example: severe burn injuries). But still, in this case i really really hope she is wrong!
I agree. I am doing everything I can to help her fight infection, and so far it seems we're winning the fight. Fingers crossed.
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
22,117
30,548
1,102
Colorado Rockies
I have had the unique experience of having the skin on one-third of my body suddenly go AWOL due to critical burns. That's where I learned how important to bodily functions a complete set of skin is.

First there was the excruciating pain with all those nerve endings exposed, minus the ones that burned away completely. Then there was the underlying muscle pain from exposed muscle tissue. Finally, the longest agony was the constant weeping of the skin until weeks later, new skin grew. Meanwhile, I was left to do my own wound treatment on myself, debriding every single day to avoid infection, and trying to keep the wounds moist so they wouldn't dry out and get infected.

Chickens are not immune to experiencing this same sort of agony when injured similarly. I know you understand this, and I am grateful for that. I am hoping you also realize the tremendous commitment you are undertaking for the care of her wounds. When I cared for my missing skin, it became a second "career" for those long weeks. I was lectured by the nurse that originally gave me emergency burn treatment that if I became the least bit lax in my daily care, infection would quickly set in and cause tremendous problems, not to mention renewed pain and much worse scarring than usual.
 

mrswalker

Chirping
May 7, 2020
38
172
56
I have had the unique experience of having the skin on one-third of my body suddenly go AWOL due to critical burns. That's where I learned how important to bodily functions a complete set of skin is.

First there was the excruciating pain with all those nerve endings exposed, minus the ones that burned away completely. Then there was the underlying muscle pain from exposed muscle tissue. Finally, the longest agony was the constant weeping of the skin until weeks later, new skin grew. Meanwhile, I was left to do my own wound treatment on myself, debriding every single day to avoid infection, and trying to keep the wounds moist so they wouldn't dry out and get infected.

Chickens are not immune to experiencing this same sort of agony when injured similarly. I know you understand this, and I am grateful for that. I am hoping you also realize the tremendous commitment you are undertaking for the care of her wounds. When I cared for my missing skin, it became a second "career" for those long weeks. I was lectured by the nurse that originally gave me emergency burn treatment that if I became the least bit lax in my daily care, infection would quickly set in and cause tremendous problems, not to mention renewed pain and much worse scarring than usual.
I'm so sorry you went through that, it sounds horrible!

With this hen, she's my concern through the day and night. I have another rescue hen who is receiving slightly less intensive care. I hope to take in other birds in need of help once this one is no longer needing me.
 

cassie

Crowing
11 Years
Mar 19, 2009
6,654
3,399
441
Thank you both for your thoughts. I agree with your assessment of her eyes on the first day, that photo was taken within an hour of getting her home. By the next morning her eyes were perked up and lively again, responsive.
Just keep slathering on the antibiotic ointment and please, keep us updated. Inquiring minds want to know how she is doing.
 

mrswalker

Chirping
May 7, 2020
38
172
56
Can anyone describe what an infection smells like? I ask because she does have a mild funky smell, but all the descriptions I find is that it smells like shit, smells terrible, etc. It's unpleasant but it isn't that severe. I wonder if it's just because she's not fully clean yet. I do plan on bathing her tonight, but I am curious.
 

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