Chicken Math Strikes Again

Acre4Me

Free Ranging
Nov 12, 2017
3,380
7,190
517
Western Ohio
Yup- me too. Ordered 9 chicks across three breeds (possibly 12 chicks if the 4th breed has enough fertile eggs to hatch). I pick them up in 18 days. However, our normally very broody hen isn’t broody!!! Was hoping she’d adopt some chicks and raise them for us as she’s been an awesome adoptive momma hen several times in the past. <sigh>

to fit these new ones in, we will either butcher some or sell at auction. Really no room at the inn. But they’ll be in the brooder for several weeks, so there's still time for decisions as to who goes away.

we have ordered Welsumner, Light Brahma, and Buff Orpington -all new to us. We love trying new breeds!
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium member
7 Years
Nov 27, 2012
72,288
75,262
1,557
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
We have gotten into a harvest cycle that will prevent most from seeing their 1st birthday.
That's only ~6mo of egg production......I wait until at least 18mo.

Compiling this in excel (sounds tedious but once you have it set up it takes 2 secs) I can see trends throughout the months and year to year.
Exactly!! ..and it does all the math(real math) for you.
I do much the same....but don't record nest used. :D
 

Mtnboomer

Songster
Mar 17, 2019
234
419
102
Southwest Virginia (mountains)
Aart - I am raising them for meat and eggs. I prefer to butcher young to keep meat tender ut no bird goes to waste. Ultimately, the time of harvest is determined by our friend doing the genes study. When he's finished with a line we have to make room for the next generation.
I keep track of which box is used just for my own curiosity, but now I am fascinated how the most popular box fluctuates.
 

Noellereagan

Songster
Jun 20, 2018
727
1,572
222
Big Bend, Wisconsin
I’m rather impressed with your current hens turning 9. I felt compelled to give you a pat on the back. Although it’s a widespread belief that most chickens have the ability to reach 9 or even older- you don’t actually hear people making that claim often. I’ve come to the conclusion that chickens occupy their days by finding new ways to die. I’m being silly obviously, but it seems so sometimes. I’ve fully committed to “death-proofing” our farm. We have a ton of time and money invested. And even more heart (we raise very rare breeds and varieties). I am pretty attached to all of our main breeder flocks. And while we aren’t close to our ninth year- when we are, I truly hope I can make your claim of having what’s considered old hens! You must take very good care of your birds. Well worth my time to pat you on the back and acknowledge this accomplishment! :bow
who else has flock members nine or older!
 

CatWhisperer

Crowing
6 Years
Jun 16, 2013
968
3,017
301
northwest Arkansas
you might be ok. My neighbor’s all-Leghorn flock laid like clockwork for 2 winters, experiencing a 5-week molt in early fall. He decided to cull at 2 years (contributing to the great circle of life by releasing them in a relatives land with permission), and getting a new flock of Leghorns. They’ve laid all this past winter (no added light), but it’s their first winter.
I think he could still have contributed by giving them a humane and quick death with an ax. To release chickens like that to die an ugly death from predators is just aweful and irresponsible.
 

Acre4Me

Free Ranging
Nov 12, 2017
3,380
7,190
517
Western Ohio
I think he could still have contributed by giving them a humane and quick death with an ax. To release chickens like that to die an ugly death from predators is just aweful and irresponsible.
not too much different than free-ranging that many people practice!
 

Canuck88

Songster
Jul 17, 2019
162
513
156
BC
I think he could still have contributed by giving them a humane and quick death with an ax. To release chickens like that to die an ugly death from predators is just aweful and irresponsible.
I agree 100%

not too much different than free-ranging that many people practice!
It’s very different. People who choose to free range their birds do so in general for most of the bird’s life. They are used to foraging and finding cover etc. Keeping a flock of egg layers in a coop/run situation for 2 years and then moving them to another property and turning them loose is a horrible death sentence.
 

Acre4Me

Free Ranging
Nov 12, 2017
3,380
7,190
517
Western Ohio
Except that free range birds usually still have a coop for protection at night. A chicken on the open ground after nightfall is easy pickings. Not judging just acknowledging that there is a difference between free range and free release.
Of course, pretty obvious. However, it does often get touted as wonderful-best-ever to free range despite predator attacks during daytime when the supposedly loved chicken get torn to bits while alive or those keepers that don’t actually close them up at night or let them roost wherever. But, for the record, I’ve never done that (release into the great circle of life type scenario, or plan to), and my chickens are provided with safe housing.
 

Acre4Me

Free Ranging
Nov 12, 2017
3,380
7,190
517
Western Ohio
I agree 100%



It’s very different. People who choose to free range their birds do so in general for most of the bird’s life. They are used to foraging and finding cover etc. Keeping a flock of egg layers in a coop/run situation for 2 years and then moving them to another property and turning them loose is a horrible death sentence.
yup, because a loved free range bird NEVER get ripped to bits, while alive during daylight hours... and not all are given safe housing.
 

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