Chicken still in shock after 5 days?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Dixiebird, Jul 26, 2016.

  1. Dixiebird

    Dixiebird New Egg

    3
    0
    7
    May 12, 2011
    A young cat managed to get into our chicken run at evening; most of the chickens had already gone inside the coop, but one was still out. The cat was desperately trying to escape, running back and forth, and scared the one chicken terribly. I don't think he harmed the chicken, but after we got him out, the chicken wasn't acting herself. At the time we didn't think a whole lot about it (we had checked her over for injuries) so we put her in the coop with the others and closed the door for the night.

    However, the next morning we found her just sitting on the floor of the coop in the far corner. She didn't get up when we let the others out, or try to get away when we picked her up. Concerned, we checked her over (again) for injuries, but didn't find any. After some research, we figured that she was in shock. It wasn't cold out at all (in the 80's at night), but we brought her inside anyway. We put her in a box with some hay in a room with dimmed light. She occasionally moves, but not walking around. Her comb was very pale and she only makes the saddest clucking noises. She wouldn't drink or eat anything, but we set out some food and water anyway.

    That was Thursday morning....she still is acting the same, though I have been able to get her to eat some tomato and yogurt. I haven't seen her drinking any water, but I'm assuming she's had to. I've been dripping water onto her beak, and she'll drink that (the poor dear is going to hate me if she pulls through...); it just doesn't seem like enough to be living on. She is a four month old White Marans. I feel so bad for her, but don't know what else to do? [​IMG] How long can a chicken be in shock? Any suggestions would be very much appreciated.
     
  2. BackyardFlock17

    BackyardFlock17 Out Of The Brooder

    74
    5
    23
    Jul 7, 2016
    Can you take her to a vet?
     
  3. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    9,470
    2,566
    366
    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    @TwoCrows has a couple of good ideas in the link provided below. A ticking clock and soft classical music.
    There is no timeline in how long they will be traumatized, but if you can't get her to eat or drink then time is getting short.
    Can you take her out in the mornings to see the other chickens and get some sunshine? With her being isolated so long, she will need to be reintegrated anyway, so you may want to cage her in the run a few hours a day for "play dates". Hopefully seeing the other chickens acting normal may help her.


    You are right that she needs hydration. If you have some poultry vitamins, offer some in her water. Wet foods are usually a hit, so wet some of her feed, add some yogurt, egg, tuna or meat, whatever you can get her to eat, but she needs to get some nutrition.

    Let us know how she is doing.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1069687/traumatized-chickens (Post#2 and 6)
     
  4. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

    32,017
    4,693
    581
    Mar 21, 2011
    New Mexico, USA
    My Coop
    @Dixiebird I am so sorry about your bird. [​IMG] She may have fallen with all the excitement and injured herself internally. Maybe even hit her head trying to escape. Shock really shouldn't last this long. Shock is natures way of shutting off the body functions before actual death takes place. So I am thinking she must have hurt herself somehow. A knock to the head could have caused a concussion or even damaged her spinal cord in the neck somewhere. I am only guessing here.

    At this point, unless you can access a vet for some x-rays, which I know is not possible sometimes, you might keep her in a fairly darkened room. No blaring lights, noise or any quick movements. This can cause nausea in a patient with a head or spinal injury. Keep her warm. 80 degrees is perfect. I wouldn't let her get any colder, as odd as this sounds in the middle of summer. When a bird gets injured, they get cold.

    Feed her what ever she will eat. I am not sure about forcing liquids into her beak at this point as if she does have a spinal cord injury, you can damage it further. So I would feed her foods with moisture already in them...like watermelon, fruits, veggies, mushy oatmeal or grits, just things that already have water. Usually, but not always, if a bird is eating, they are drinking. It doesn't always work the other way unfortunately, a bird can be drinking and not eating. So hopefully she is sipping on water here and there.

    And just let her rest. Don't fuss with her, don't pick her up unless you have to. As long as she isn't really soiling herself, I wouldn't even worry about poop stuck to her butt. I would just let her be by herself inside the house away from everything. Quite music does wonders for a sick bird. Tune into some classical music set quietly. Also...a ticking clock set up right next to her. Clocks are incredible blood pressure stablizers. I have seen sick birds in my hospital cages curl right up to a ticking clock. (just make SURE the alarm is not set. LOL) But the radio and the clock will really help her to relax and help her heal. I have witnessed this dozens of times over my bird keeping years.

    Good luck with her and please keep us posted!! :)
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. Dixiebird

    Dixiebird New Egg

    3
    0
    7
    May 12, 2011
    Thank you for all your helpful suggestions :)
    I took her out for a bit to see the other chickens earlier; they seemed more curious about her than vice versa... We don't live in an area that has much livestock, so I don't think a vet would be able to help her much. I'll keep trying to feed her [I've got some electrolytes for her water, too], and will try the classical music. Thanks again :) I'll post how things turn out.
     
  6. Bocktobery 10

    Bocktobery 10 Chillin' With My Peeps

    542
    35
    151
    Oct 8, 2010
    I'm concerned that the stress she went through brought on something latent. Chickens are dirty animals (Their beaks in it all day practically) with awesome immune systems, but when something like trauma (in any form) happens, then they can get sick from anything their body was already fighting.

    I would say she's been in shock for too long, but I suppose it is possible. I'm not there to view how she is, so it very well could be just that. If she doesn't start eating I would start to tube feed her. I'd also probably start her on an antibiotic if I saw that her droppings were showing signs of infection. Does she feel like she has a fever? (comb hot to the touch) Maybe she needs to be dewormed? Or maybe she has mites? Mites plus stress can greatly tax a hen. Just some suggestions here. You didn't say you checked for these things, so I'm just throwing them out in case you didn't check for those things.

    Its good that you brought her inside.. someplace cozy, quiet, where there is not much activity. That way she can rest.

    I want to encourage you to read about tube feeding if you haven't already. See the post here labeled "Go Team Tube Feeding" . I've been able to save a few birds doing this. Its scary at first, but the more you do it, the better you get until its so simple you don't think about it anymore. ... Best of all, you witness your bird pull through its illness. (Well, not always, but you can increase their chances a lot by doing it) Start immediately when you realise your chicken is "off food" (not eating at all). Don't wait!

    Best wishes for your hen. I hope she recovers for you.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2016
  7. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

    32,017
    4,693
    581
    Mar 21, 2011
    New Mexico, USA
    My Coop
    I wouldn't pick her up much for now. You don't know what damage you might be doing by moving her.

    If you do use the music, only use it during the day and turn it off at night. But keep the clock ticking 24/7

    Keep the water right up in her face. A sick bird may not get up to get a drink even if they are thirsty. But if it is readily available by leaning over to it without standing, she may drink a lot more. Make sure she stays upright and use towels to support her if need be.

    keep us posted! :)
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by