Chicken with a limp

hdrose1

In the Brooder
Mar 9, 2017
8
0
17
One of my chickens started limping and acting funny the other day. She puts some pressure on it but not a lot at all. She still is roosting on the high roosts with the others and eating and drinking. No loose wing either. What could it be? and what can I do to help? I posted a picture and video below.
favechick.jpg
 

Glenda Heywoodo

Songster
Dec 19, 2016
1,007
134
126
Cassville Missouri
lOOKS LIKE IT HAS BEEN PULLED ON
MAYBE SHE GOT CAUGHT SOME WHEE AND WHEN FREEING HER SELF PULLED IT OUT OF JOINT.
I WOULD SEE SHE DOES NOT USE ROOST FOR A WHILE. mAYBE THAT WOULD HEAL IT.
 

kljonesdvm

Chirping
May 17, 2017
14
14
54
South Kona, Hawaii
Check the bottom of her foot and make sure she doesn't have a sore there. if you see a bump with a dark center scab, search the forums for "Bumble foot". Best of luck!
 

Glenda Heywoodo

Songster
Dec 19, 2016
1,007
134
126
Cassville Missouri
Glenda Heywood IT IS IMPORTANT you do not doctor or touch the chicken with out plastic gloves on, as if you have any kind of wound it will infect you also. If the bird is not important to your chicken group, I would say the kindness thing is to have some one put her out of her misery. Safer for you also. BESURE AND
WASH WITH CLOROX WATER AND SOAP IN WASHER EVERY TIME YOU HANDLE HER YOUR CLOTHES. safety in healthy situations is a must in sickness situations also.

ARTICLE ON TREATING FOOT SORES

In early stages, administering antibiotics may be all that’s needed. Several registered antibiotics are available for chickens: lincomycin and amoxicillin are two common ones. Many can be purchased at farm stores, or you can ask a veterinarian where to get them. Read and follow the label directions to determine the correct dosage and find out how to administer the antibiotic to birds. You must give the antibiotics for the full time the label directs.

Soaking the foot also helps, especially if the injury has progressed to the hard stage. Put a cup of Epsom salts in a dish pan of hot water — water that feels hot but doesn’t burn your hand. Then hold the chicken’s foot in the pan until the water cools, about 10 to 15 minutes. Don’t let the bird drink any of the water.

The soaking should soften the abscess. Gently remove the scab, and try to open the wound by pulling it apart at the wound edges rather than squeezing it. Rinse the wound with hydrogen peroxide, and try to gently clean out any pus. Then apply an antibiotic ointment that’s safe for birds (ask a vet for a recommendation).

Pad the wound with a clean gauze pad, and wrap it with first-aid tape or vet wrap. The wound should be cleaned, flushed, and rewrapped once a day until it looks like it’s healing. All dressings and soaking fluids will be loaded with bacteria and should be disposed of carefully.

Leave the treatment of such an abscess to a vet if soaking and pulling apart the wound edges doesn’t open the wound so it can drain and be cleaned. Watch birds being treated with antibiotics for diarrhea, which is caused by good bacteria that’s also being destroyed, and add some “digestive health yogurt” to the chicken’s diet to help restore it.

BUMBLE FOOT PERSE:

A limping chicken is no minor issue in a backyard coop. Often, this is a sign of bumblefoot. Bumblefoot is a bacterial infection or abscess of the foot. Treating bumblefoot is simple, but crucial; foot sores can be contagious and an untreated case can cause death.

Bumblefoot generally occurs in heavy roosters, but it can affect other birds as well. It’s caused by a cut or even a small scrape to the bird’s foot that gets contaminated by bacteria, usually staph. Rough perches and wire cage floors are common causes of these cuts and scratches. Large, heavy birds that jump down from high perches also can injure the foot.

•A large swelling on the bottom of the foot or on a toe that may feel soft in early stages and hard later.

•The foot looks red and inflamed and may feel hot to the touch. A black scab usually forms over the sore.

•The bird may limp and refuse to do much walking.

Use gloves to examine or treat birds suspected of having bumblefoot, because the staph or other bacteria that cause the abscess can infect humans. Put the bird in a cage with clean, soft litter such as pine shavings. Isolate the bird from other chickens because the bacteria could infect them too
 
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hdrose1

In the Brooder
Mar 9, 2017
8
0
17
Check the bottom of her foot and make sure she doesn't have a sore there. if you see a bump with a dark center scab, search the forums for "Bumble foot". Best of luck!
I've looked her leg and foot over real good and there's no sore or unusual bumps on it. I soaked it last night as you see in the picture to double check and nothing. I think it's got to be a pulled muscle or tendon. She's my favorite girl so I am really hoping I can get her feeling better!
 

kljonesdvm

Chirping
May 17, 2017
14
14
54
South Kona, Hawaii
Hopefully you are right and some rest is all that is needed. Soaking it may help regardless just to get some good blood flow going there. There are anti-inflammatories and pain meds that can be given to chickens but you'd have to check with a vet that does chickens since most of them would be off-label use and may not be allowed in a laying hen. Keep us updated!
 

hdrose1

In the Brooder
Mar 9, 2017
8
0
17
I hope so! After a few days I think I may have figured it out. She is starting to walk a little better but more like she is just getting used to the pain. I looked at her leg again real good and the middle toe is kinda limp, so I think she may have sprained or broken her toe. I will try soaking her legs again just in case. But she seems to be on the up and up! Fingers crossed!
 

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