chickens pecking others

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by muddstopper, Mar 11, 2009.

  1. muddstopper

    muddstopper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 23, 2008
    Murphy NC
    I have 7 point of lay black australopes hens and 3 roos. They are just about ready to start laying. This week, I got 7 more 2 month old chicks and placed in the same coop. These birds are just barely feathered out. The older birds wont let the younger birds near the feeder or water. Our run is made out of two seperate dogpens and my wife has been splitting the birds during the day to stop the pecking and to ensure the little birds get food and water. I am wondering if this bullying will stop after a few days once the older birds get used to the new additions, or will it continue. I have been planning building another coop, but working out of town right and dont have the time.
     
  2. BarmyBantams

    BarmyBantams New Egg

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    Mar 11, 2009
    I'm encountering the same thing with my new Buff Peking Henny Penny. She is the new gal, with my 2 silkies Lil Peep and Pumpkin having been with us for about 2 months.

    While they aren't stopping her eating every little thing seems to tick them off and they chase her around pecking her head, jumping on her and just being mean. Pumpkin jumped on her and tried to mount her but only did this once. This is the chicken without spurs, crowing or anything else but does that mean she is a roo?

    I only got my Pekin yesturday, is this due to them settling in? I have the same question as muddstopper above [​IMG]

    B x
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2009
  3. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    First of all, it's really important to quarantine any new chickens with the exception of day olds from the hatchery.
    They need to be seperate, yet together. Can you rig it so that the resident chickens can see the new ones, but not get to them for awhile? After that, start letting them mingle together under supervision before throwing them all together.
    It's always a good idea to have two feeders and waterers even in established flocks. The higher ranking chickens in the pecking order can starve out a lower ranking member.
     

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