Collect eggs more often in the winter

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by tryingtohaveitall, Nov 6, 2009.

  1. tryingtohaveitall

    tryingtohaveitall Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 17, 2009
    SW Ohio
    Do you collect eggs more frequently in the winter to keep them from freezing? How long does it take for an egg to freeze anyway? (realizing the answer varies dependent on the temperature)
     
  2. RlgNorth

    RlgNorth Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 18, 2009
    North Pole, ALASKA
    Im kidnof wondering the same thing... Since it get in the negatives here and I am stay at home mom I check 3-4 times a day just in case. I think when it gets in the -20 or colder I will check more often to prevent them from freezing.
     
  3. dovecanyon

    dovecanyon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 15, 2009
    Niland, CA
    It never gets cold enough here to freeze anything, but I am curious... does an egg have to be thrown away if it freezes? I'm assuming it won't be good to eat after it thaws out?
     
  4. Sunny the Hippie Chick

    Sunny the Hippie Chick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 8, 2008
    Brookings Oregon
    I have been told you can freeze older eggs. Ones that have a bit larger air cell, that way they dont explode. But you cant use them for fried eggs after they are frozen. They have to be scrambled or used in a recipe. My Science teacher back in high school froze eggs before going on hiking trips.
     
  5. BeardedLadyFarm

    BeardedLadyFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 31, 2009
    Cobleskill NY
    I have been advised to get one of those heat mats used for starting seedlings to put under the nest to prevent this from happening. I imagine you could just run it for a couple of hours in the morning during laying time.

    I accidentally froze a couple of eggs in the fridge this week. The shell cracked, but the membrane was still in tact. They scrambled up just fine, but were a little watery looking for a fried egg.
     

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