Color genetics thread.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by redrooster99, Sep 26, 2014.

  1. rainbowrooster

    rainbowrooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you just want a creamy color then I would suggest crossing the lavender bird onto a production red or New Hampshire. You dont have to worry about the pattern gene with lacing, they grow much faster than Wyandottes and they lay better.

    If you breed F1s back to golds only 25% (not 50%) of the offspring will carry lavender but you wont know which ones. Also, since you are not worried about lacing it will cost you time, money, feed and, more pens/cages without substantial results. No need to deal with uncertainties when a sibling mating of F1s will leave no doubt which birds are lavender in your F2s. If you are not happy with the lavender F2s then breed those back to the original golds for F3s. Sib mate the F3s to get lavender F4s.
     
  2. rainbowchick

    rainbowchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I AM interested in lacing. The plan is a cream bird with lavender lace.
    I'll also be simultaneously working on a Lavender Wheaten project (which won't have lacing).
    And with a "novelty" bird like this, I don't really think production and growth are big deciding factors here. ;)
     
  3. Garjzla

    Garjzla Overrun With Chickens

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  4. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    Just in case- would avoid using wheatens in a lacing project. They often give bad problems with poor lacing on breasts. A little heads up in case you get tempted to cross for introducing new blood or...
     
  5. rainbowchick

    rainbowchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The Lavender Wheatens will be pure Ameraucanas (just not an approved color).
    The Lavender laced will be EEs. Although, I did a little more research and decided to go with an Orpington gold laced, since I won't have to deal with yellow leg genes then, and could (in theory) work the birds towards Ameraucana standard (over many generations).
    I *had* wondered what I'd get if I crossed the two. ;)
    Seems to me like an isabel crossed with an isabel would be a pretty looking bird, regardless of pattern.... But in reality, I'd rather not mess up the gene pool that much! Wheaten would bring a whole slew of new problems to the mix.
     
  6. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    That it would!

    Yep isabels are beautiful no matter the pattern. I would love to see pictures of your future isabels for sure. Especially isabel laceds!

    Gold lace orps seems to be good choice.

    You aware of genetics behind white legs?
     
  7. Garjzla

    Garjzla Overrun With Chickens

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    So, what are the main colors to make lacing? I think lacing is beautiful and wouldn't mind making laced hybrids. Or do you just have to have two laced chickens for laced babies?
     
  8. stonefeather

    stonefeather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think I have a similar question about lacing. I am trying to learn what genes are responsible for lacing on blue bird E/E Bl/bl. Is it simply Ml or do you need Ml and pg? Is it Ml that concentrates the black pigment at the end of the feather? Or maybe I am completely off the mark? I have only just started learning about patterns. Thanks!
     
  9. Garjzla

    Garjzla Overrun With Chickens

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    I need to learn what MI, E/E, and all of these other things mean.
     
  10. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    This is extremely important in learning to answer some of your questions.. like the recent one about lacing. It's because it involves several genes and how it expresses on whole bird depends on a few other genes... very complicated to answer it especially without using the genetic notations.

    if you are serious, use google to find two well known poultry genetics websites. One lists the the genes and 'spells out' some chicken patterns. The other site is called the chicken calculator but it has some very nice pages including one on lacing.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2015

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