Color in wattle and comb

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by toby_alexis&makenzie, Mar 12, 2015.

  1. toby_alexis&makenzie

    toby_alexis&makenzie Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 28, 2010
    My light Brahma was dust bathing this afternoon or resting on the ground, one or the other, anyway I noticed the colors of her comb and wattle was faded to a light red almost yellow. When she stood up they turned their regular deep red. This happened each time she lay down and stood back up. We've had her and a Buff Orpington for about a week now. The light Brahma has yet to lay, but the Buff is moving on along laying one a day. I'm guessing the Brahma is not laying yet cause she hasn't gotten comfortable yet?
     
  2. toby_alexis&makenzie

    toby_alexis&makenzie Out Of The Brooder

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    I started them on some probiotics and electrolytes to assure coccidiosis is not a factor and noticed too that one of them will sneeze every now and again. I'll take a pic of both when I can and see if I can get a pic of Brahma laying down with the discoloration.
     
  3. toby_alexis&makenzie

    toby_alexis&makenzie Out Of The Brooder

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    Here's the pictures I promised...[​IMG]

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  4. toby_alexis&makenzie

    toby_alexis&makenzie Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 28, 2010
    She wouldn't lay down with me at the coop. She's thinking I had treats for her. Wife made a kale and cornbread salad for them earlier this morning. They loved the cornbread but picked a little at the kale.
     
  5. justplainbatty

    justplainbatty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What kind of feed are they on? How old are they supposed to be? Why does their water look so gross? (don't mean to be rude, just concerned).
     
  6. toby_alexis&makenzie

    toby_alexis&makenzie Out Of The Brooder

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    The water has since been changed out. It looked gross to me too. That was the electrolytes and probiotic yellow powder mixed in. I think I might have had it too strong. There feed is FRM (Flint River Mills) 15% layer crumble. They are both a little under a year old.
     
  7. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    Color changes in the comb, especially sudden changes, usually indicate oxygen levels in the blood are going up and down. But the comb usually appears washed out and dusky and slightly tending toward purple when there's an oxygen problem as in respiratory infection.

    A bright red comb can signify fever or over-heating. Maybe that's what you observed. Your Brahma may have been cool in her dirt hole, and warmed up when she got back up.
     
  8. justplainbatty

    justplainbatty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh good(about the water change) it's really important that they get fresh clean water every day. Make sure you are giving the girls oyster shell on the side along with their feed every day. Try feeding just the kale w/o the corn bread, it has lots of good vitamins and stuff. BOSS and meal worms are good snacks too. Both are higher in protein than the feed you are using.
     
  9. toby_alexis&makenzie

    toby_alexis&makenzie Out Of The Brooder

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    Okay thank you. They seem much happier with the clear water.
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    BTW.....Probiotics and electrolytes will do nothing for coccidia.

    15% is a bare minimum protein level, IMO, I would not be feeding any other foods that would dilute the protein level further.
    One week is not long to adjust to a new environment, give her some time.

    ETA: azygous gave good info on the changing comb color.
    This drove me nuts when my pullets were close to lay and I was observing their combs closely looking for them to plump and turn redder....they would look very red, then pale out again as I was watching.


    I like to feed a 'flock raiser' 20% protein crumble to all ages and genders, as non-layers(chicks, males and all molting birds) do not need the extra calcium that is in layer feed and chicks and molters can use the extra protein. Makes life much simpler to store and distribute one type of chow that everyone can eat.

    Calcium should be available at all times for the layers, I use oyster shell mixed with rinsed, dried, crushed chicken egg shells in a separate container.

    Animal protein (mealworms, a little cheese - beware the salt content, meat scraps) is provided during molting and if I see any feather eating.

    The higher protein crumble also offsets the 8% protein scratch grains and other kitchen/garden scraps I like to offer.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2015

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