Coop design, construction options

Rodrad

In the Brooder
Nov 9, 2020
93
41
37
Southern Indiana
That’s correct. I probably should put in more ventilation but it had t been an issue yet. If I get nice weather this weekend I will add some more on the south side.

I think @21hens-incharge is correct, build more ventilation than you think you need. You can always close shutters later.
Thank you very much for following up. Yes, I agree I will build little more than 0.5 ft2/ 10 ft2 floor space for winter ventilation (plus I may have some cracks around door jambs!). I believe that a most common advice of 1 ft2 / chicken applies for summer and not for winter. For summer I plan to have additional ~ 6 ft2 of ventilation area (~2 ft2/ 10 ft2). So altogether this will be ~ 2.5ft2 /10 ft2 of the floor OR (with 4 ft2/chicken) that calculates to be 1 ft2/chicken.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
Nov 27, 2012
88,062
106,834
1,737
SW Michigan
My Coop
I do not glue or nail anything, deck screws all around,
in case for when you have to 're-do' something.
If you need more structural screws, by the proper pilot bit for the screws you intend to use.

Don't fraction your math so tight, leave room to grow your flock.
'Only sleeping and laying' in the coop doesn't always work out.
Hard numbers don't take into account specific climates.
The 'rules of thumb' tossed out are minimums, IMO.
3 good reads linked in my signature, check 'em out.
(might have to turn phone to landscape to see them)

I am located in southern Indiana, in Columbus.
Here's how to add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, and then it's always there!
1605131797997.png
 

Rodrad

In the Brooder
Nov 9, 2020
93
41
37
Southern Indiana
I do not glue or nail anything, deck screws all around,
in case for when you have to 're-do' something.
If you need more structural screws, by the proper pilot bit for the screws you intend to use.

Don't fraction your math so tight, leave room to grow your flock.
'Only sleeping and laying' in the coop doesn't always work out.
Hard numbers don't take into account specific climates.
The 'rules of thumb' tossed out are minimums, IMO.
3 good reads linked in my signature, check 'em out.
(might have to turn phone to landscape to see them)


Here's how to add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, and then it's always there!
View attachment 2407847
Thank you for your input. BTW, my thinking to use the liquid nails on the edges of the pine boards is to prevent gaps and air leaks, especially in the walls around the roosting area.
I followed your advise and imputed some other information in my account.
 

U_Stormcrow

Songster
Jun 7, 2020
748
1,358
196
North FL Panhandle Region / Wiregrass
Drafts are a problem, air "leaks" generally are not. Liquid Nails is probably overkill.

Personally, I'd use more lumber and less time, shiplap the wood rather than attempting to dress it up with a joiner. Painting the inside is likely unnecessary either.

Count me in the "more is better" camp for ventilation, so long as it doesn't result in drafts on the roosts.

I have a hotter, more humid climate. In addition to under soffit vents feeding a ridge vent (I do not have a purlin parallel with the top of the walls to gain a bit more vent space), my entire 80 sq ft coop sits 3' off the ground, and is built around a 4'x4' central "shaft" (technically, the door opens into this area - so shaded air under the coop, which is cooler, is drawn in as warm air under the sheet metal roof is drawn out. Additionally, I add a few sq ft in a hinged window on the door, and a bit more in a screened gable vent above said door. The lower section (for my ducks) is closer to 100 sq ft, and is open (well, live stock fencing plus chicken wire) on three sides.
 

Rodrad

In the Brooder
Nov 9, 2020
93
41
37
Southern Indiana
Drafts are a problem, air "leaks" generally are not. Liquid Nails is probably overkill.

Personally, I'd use more lumber and less time, shiplap the wood rather than attempting to dress it up with a joiner. Painting the inside is likely unnecessary either.

Count me in the "more is better" camp for ventilation, so long as it doesn't result in drafts on the roosts.

I have a hotter, more humid climate. In addition to under soffit vents feeding a ridge vent (I do not have a purlin parallel with the top of the walls to gain a bit more vent space), my entire 80 sq ft coop sits 3' off the ground, and is built around a 4'x4' central "shaft" (technically, the door opens into this area - so shaded air under the coop, which is cooler, is drawn in as warm air under the sheet metal roof is drawn out. Additionally, I add a few sq ft in a hinged window on the door, and a bit more in a screened gable vent above said door. The lower section (for my ducks) is closer to 100 sq ft, and is open (well, live stock fencing plus chicken wire) on three sides.
Thanks, for your input. I never done shiplap walls. I just wonder if my planks (5/8”x5.5”) may crack when I screw it to the frame because they are not laying flat against the studs.
When air leak (through the gaps of butted edges of the planks) becomes draft - any ideas?
Thank you
 

Rodrad

In the Brooder
Nov 9, 2020
93
41
37
Southern Indiana
Thank you, read that article, it is an excellent discussion.
Based On that discussion I will have my both winter vents placed on gables (one in East and one in west).

Before reading this article I thought to put one vent midway up the wall opposite of the wall where is the roost, and the other two smaller vents on the gables. That was based of my thinking that cold air should come at lower position (but still not directly at the roosting planks) and hot air would go out through two vents in the gables.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
Nov 27, 2012
88,062
106,834
1,737
SW Michigan
My Coop
Thank you, read that article, it is an excellent discussion.
Based On that discussion I will have my both winter vents placed on gables (one in East and one in west).

Before reading this article I thought to put one vent midway up the wall opposite of the wall where is the roost, and the other two smaller vents on the gables. That was based of my thinking that cold air should come at lower position (but still not directly at the roosting planks) and hot air would go out through two vents in the gables.
It is, indeed.

Have you started building your coop yet, or are in in the planning stages?
Got drawings, sketches?
 

Rodrad

In the Brooder
Nov 9, 2020
93
41
37
Southern Indiana
It is, indeed.

Have you started building your coop yet, or are in in the planning stages?
Got drawings, sketches?
I appreciate your interest in my design. At this time I have just a very schematic drawing of the front of the coop, somewhat in scale for about 9-10 chickens. It is just a second draft schematic. Most likely I will use an old door, which I think is 36” wide, may need to cut it to the desired height. Also, plan only one window on east side, upper part can be opened in summer. All the vents and the open part of the window will be covered with hardware 1/2” cloth.
 

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aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
Nov 27, 2012
88,062
106,834
1,737
SW Michigan
My Coop
I appreciate your interest in my design. At this time I have just a very schematic drawing of the front of the coop, somewhat in scale for about 9-10 chickens.
I'm an old drafter, learned on the board then 2 decades on CADD.
Looks like you may have some experience there too?
Odd scale tho, follows your other number splitting ;)
Noted scale doesn't really match the dimensions,
could get you in trouble, and drive you nuts, once you start to build.

I will suggest again that you go bigger than the 4sqft per bird rule.
5x8 is odd for standard lumber sizes.
 

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