1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Cost and colors...

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by arherp, Oct 11, 2011.

  1. arherp

    arherp Chillin' With My Peeps

    795
    7
    131
    Sep 29, 2009
    Kentucky
    What is the going rate for this years' silver pied peachicks? Hen and cock prices.
    If I go buy a few colors, what would be good ones to get and let breed together? I guess, what ones are compatable, what colors can be mixed and not ruin each other?
     
  2. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:The colors in peafowl are the result of only one or two genes, so breeding them together will give you regular-looking IB's that are split to both colors that the parents were. Your average non-breeder buyer will look at the offspring and just see "IB" even though they are split to other colors, so it'd be harder to get more money for them than you'd get for regular IB birds.

    There are three exceptions -- the sex-linked Purple, Cameo and Peach. If you get a male in one of these colors, you can breed them to any other color female, and the offspring that look like the dad will be his daughters, and the offspring that are IB in color will be his sons. The sons will carry one copy of Purple, Cameo or Peach, but males need two copies to show the color. Here's an example using Purple.

    If you got a Purple male and put him in with a Purple hen, a Java hen, and a Bronze hen, this is what you'd get:

    From the Purple hen = 100% Purple offspring (males and females)

    From the Java hen = 50% Purple Spalding females, 50% Spalding males split to Purple (all will have 50% green blood)

    From the Bronze hen = 50% Purple females split to Bronze, and 50% IB males split to Purple and Bronze


    You could substitute Cameo or Peach for Purple...or substitute Opal, Midnight, Jade or another autosomal recessive color for Bronze.


    And if you wanted to start an interesting project, keep one of those IB males split to a sex-linked and an autotosomal recessive color (such as the IB males split to Purple and Bronze), and then breed it back to a female that shows the autosomal recessive color (such as a Bronze female). 1/4 of the hens will be a combination of both colors (in this case, 1/4 of the females will be Purple Bronze).
     
  3. arherp

    arherp Chillin' With My Peeps

    795
    7
    131
    Sep 29, 2009
    Kentucky
    Ok, thanks for all the info. Very helpful. If I have a male Silver pied and breed it to a bronze hen, what would result?
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2011
  4. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Ugh, the dreaded white genes...haha...I'm not a fan of them, and they make me scratch my head.

    I'm assuming the Silver Pied is IB. What I THINK Silver Pied is genetically is a bird with one copy of the Pied gene, one copy of the White gene, and two copies of the White-Eyed gene (although some will have only one copy of the White-Eyed gene...these birds tend to be late in getting all of their "white eyes" as compared to those who have two copies of the gene). An IB Silver Pied would be this (if I'm right). A Bronze Silver Pied will also have two copies of the Bronze gene, but let's start from the assumption that the Silver Pied is just IB as far as color, and Silver Pied in pattern. What follows is what you'll find based on what I think Silver Pied is genetically.

    The Bronze hen will have two copies of the Bronze gene, but none of the genes that make up Silver Pied.

    So, from mom, all offspring will get one copy of the Bronze gene. From Dad, they will get either one copy of Pied or one copy of White. If dad has two copies of White-Eyed, they will all also get one copy of that gene. If dad has only one copy, then half will get a copy of that gene, and half won't.

    If dad has two copies of White-Eye, the offspring will be:

    1/2 IB White-Eye (one copy of the gene shows the trait, but not as strongly as birds with two copies) split to Pied and Bronze (generally the "less white" of this hatch)

    1/2 IB White-Eye (one copy of the gene, as above) split to White and Bronze (generally the "more white" of this hatch)


    If dad has one copy of White-Eye, the offspring will be:

    1/4 IB White-Eye (one copy) split to Pied and Bronze

    1/4 IB split to Pied and Bronze (no White-Eye gene)

    1/4 IB White-Eye (one copy) split to White and Bronze

    1/4 IB split to White and Bronze (no White-Eye gene)


    If the Silver Pied was also Bronze, then take the results from above and move Bronze from after the word "split" to the front, replacing "IB." Thus they will all be Bronze in color, with the same grouping of probabilities otherwise. So the first line of offspring would be "1/2 Bronze White-Eye..." instead of "1/2 IB White-Eye...split to...Bronze." Does that make sense?


    [​IMG]
     
  5. arherp

    arherp Chillin' With My Peeps

    795
    7
    131
    Sep 29, 2009
    Kentucky
    Yep, I get it. Thanks for that, it has really helped!
    What do Bronze and Silver Pied typically sell for?
     
  6. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:...and that's where I can't help you....

    [​IMG]
     
  7. deerman

    deerman Rest in Peace 1949-2012

    9,491
    29
    293
    Aug 24, 2008
    Southern Ohio
    First silver pied is not a color.second all that about mixing colors. Like info u r gettig with take 9 years or more thats with perfecpt record.
     
  8. deerman

    deerman Rest in Peace 1949-2012

    9,491
    29
    293
    Aug 24, 2008
    Southern Ohio
    Sp can be found in most colors. Blue 50 to 100
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2011
  9. arherp

    arherp Chillin' With My Peeps

    795
    7
    131
    Sep 29, 2009
    Kentucky
    Sorry Deerman, I don't understand what you are saying?
     
  10. deerman

    deerman Rest in Peace 1949-2012

    9,491
    29
    293
    Aug 24, 2008
    Southern Ohio
    Peafowl come in 5 patterns. Silver pied , pied. Blackshoulder
    . White eye. Bared wing. None are colors. These all
    Can
    Be found in any of the 12 + colors.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by