Creating Windows on Coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by enggass, May 25, 2011.

  1. enggass

    enggass Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hey all,
    I have the book 'building chicken coops for dummies' but I still have a question. When creating a window by cutting out the T1-11 or siding material and you want to reuse that material in place, how do you go about this?
    I understand how to use a jigsaw to cut the piece out of the framed areas, but what I don't get is how you create a stop for it when hinged back into place? Do I need to install pieces of would on the inside of the frame to create a stop? Could someone please explain this?
    Thanks,
    Steve
     
  2. Farmer_Dan

    Farmer_Dan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you use a saw (jig, circular, etc) to cut out a hole, keep the piece that comes out. Then, get some hinges and attach the piece that came out onto the newly created frame.

    If the plywood is too thin, you can put small blocks behind the screws so that they will have something to screw into.

    Hope this helps. [​IMG]


    rereading your post.... I think the answer is Yes, you would need to put some wood inside for a stop. [​IMG]
     
  3. Farmer_Dan

    Farmer_Dan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    btw, crazy cool avatar you ahve there. [​IMG]
     
  4. Newbie in Screamer Al

    Newbie in Screamer Al Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes. use 1x3 or 4, screw the planks to the cut out pc. with an inch or better over lapping the edge of the cut out pc. THEN screw the hinges to the plank at the top, and the wall you cut it out of. You may want to trim 1/4 inch off all the sides of the cut out pc. before you screw the planks on so it doesn't bind when closing.
    Quote:
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2011
  5. enggass

    enggass Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So then the overlap of an inch or so acts as the stop on the outside - correct? Then I could frame around that with 1x3 or 4 and atached hinges to window frame and outter frame(attached to the wall)
     
  6. florida lee

    florida lee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I generally put the door stops on the inside ( screw a piece on the sides , top and bottom )over lapping the cut out by about 3/8" to stop the door from swinging in too far. This also prevents an air gap creating a draft. Then I frame the outside edges to look finished. the screws that hold the stops in place can also go thru wall and hold the trim in place also. screw thru either side ,which ever is eaiser.
    Don't for get the overlap will make your opening a tad smaller to you may want to consider that we cutting the opening ( making it a little larger ).
     
  7. enggass

    enggass Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I don't follow you here... do you have a picture you could post?
     
  8. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Quote:There are differnet ways to do it, of course.

    But IMO usually the best method is to put hardwarecloth on the *inside* of the opening (for security), then put battens on the outside of the flap that you've created, overhanging the edges of that flap a bit, so that they both weatherproof (to a reasonable degree) the saw kerf gap AND act as a stop (the hardwarecloth also tends to act as additional stop)

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  9. kichohana

    kichohana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    yeah yeah yeah what Pat said. take your cut-out T-111 and trim it with 1x3 or 1x4 overhanging the edges of your cut-out. the overhanging trim edges will help keep out weather.
     

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