Dadgumit! Pyr caught a chick!!!

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Julie_A, Sep 22, 2009.

  1. Julie_A

    Julie_A Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 20, 2008
    Brewton, Ala.
    My pyr Isabelle caught a chick today. I found it, covered in drool, cowering under a tree stump. Gave her a warm bath. Wrapped her in a towel and put her under a light.

    I love these pyrs, but I can't stand the thought of them constantly drooling while looking over the fence at my chicky babes.
     
  2. Yankee Chicken Ranch

    Yankee Chicken Ranch Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 4, 2009
    Rudy, Arkansas
    I raised mine with the chickens. For the first year she lived in the chicken coop. Now she is 2 years old and the chickens and geese sleep on her. If the birds make any warning sounds she runs to the noise. She actually beat my German shep up for chasing them. Maybe you need one of those electric training collars..... is she still young?
     
  3. Julie_A

    Julie_A Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 20, 2008
    Brewton, Ala.
    The six month old killed a pullet. This is the 11 month old. The chick survived the night! DH said we'll name her Lucky. LOL

    I would LOVE a shock collar. The dogs are on the other side of the fence from the chickens. They're with the goats and have been since they were young. The chickens have been here for almost as long as the dogs.

    A shock collar is going to be my best bet. Wish I knew someone I could borrow one from. I love the dogs. Just hard/frustrating when the guards turn predator.
     
  4. Julie_A

    Julie_A Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 20, 2008
    Brewton, Ala.
    [​IMG]

    My daughter, Sydney, with the younger dog, Violet.
     
  5. PortageGirl

    PortageGirl Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sorry, but it seems like some time on a leash with you, inside the chickens area, feeding the chicks and praising her when she's calm about it on a daily basis is going to do a LOT more good than a shock collar. Getting her used to the chickens as a part of her guard duties is better than having her associate them with the pain of a shock collar. Some calm and serious "Noooo"s when she thinks about grabbing, as well as praise when she acts correctly is the best medicine normally. If she didn't kill it outright, just licked and drooled on it, it doesn't seem about prey issues, more like interest and curiosity.

    Some people avoid people contact with LGDs but it isn't the only way to train them.
     
  6. Julie_A

    Julie_A Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 20, 2008
    Brewton, Ala.
    The dog pictured killed a maran pullet. We were never able to recover the body. She hid it and apparently disposed of it on her on. The older dog, in the background, stole and slobbered on the younger chick.

    I am not a fan of shock collars, by no means. years ago, had an irish setter someone had ruined by absolutely breaking her.

    I am honestly afraid that they'll just go nuts and start killing if I put in the large pen.

    These are my first LGDs. I am still won't leave goats in the pen with them to kid. I know they are young and still learning. Just don't want to put too much temptation in front of them.

    Love them and am not giving up!!!
     
  7. Julie_A

    Julie_A Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 20, 2008
    Brewton, Ala.
    I also think pack mentality has something to do with it. The younger dog, the one who killed the pullet, watches them all day through the fence.

    Sad thing is that her parents were solely charged with protecting chickens. Maybe something will click with the addition of training and she'll be okay. Keep hearing those "Grandpa Lee" words that once a dog kills a chicken, "they have that taste and will do it over and over."
     
  8. Le Canard de Barbarie

    Le Canard de Barbarie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 19, 2009
    Quote:Are they being disciplined at all? When my GP pup places a playful paw on a duckling, she quickly finds herself on her back being shook by the scruff of her neck with the word "NO" being yelled at her. After we make significant eye contact, I let her up and ignore her for a while.

    She craves my approval, and this really bothers her. Meanwhile, she lives 24/7 in direct contact with all 100 plus ducks, and has been doing this since she was six weeks old.
     

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