Damp problem in chicken coop

Naomi112234

Hatching
Nov 1, 2018
5
1
4
Hi so recently I decided to make my own chicken coop for my 2 boys as it would be more rewarding seeing them use it that just buying one.

I have made a 6ft by 3ft house that slopes like a hobbit house. It's winter (obviously) and I live in the UK so it's super super wet.

The floor of the chickens coop is soaking wet. I use straw and shavings for their bedding but they always sleep on their perch the wood unused was second hand from a friend who was going to bin it and the floor of the house has carpet so I have been using a heat lamp to try dry it up which does work but only on the area it's on it doesn't dry the whole thing of course.

I've got a ventilation hole (the size of one of my boys) with mesh wire so nothing can get in or out. And the sides where I've had to cut them aren't 100% straight as I had to cut some areas where it has rotted from being left out for years.

I was just wondering what could I do to stop the house getting wet inside as it's getting the bedding wet and I'm worried my little men will catch a cold.

Thank you
 

Birdinhand

Crowing
May 23, 2016
1,113
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Pacific Northwest
do you know if the water is coming in from the up hill side or if it's seeping from the ground (as in "ground water")? keeping the coop dry is critical, so a solution does need to be found.

Thee are a couple of areas to focus on for a solution: 1. eaves- in a rainy area like the UK and here in the Seattle area, substantial eaves are very helpful in keeping the rainwater away. 2. ground level: when the water is coming from the ground, as in a marshy area, then raising the ground level can help a lot. this is best done with some well draining substrate. using the deep litter method can help, a good 6-8" of additional litter can get the hens away from the source of the moisture. 3. ventilation: ventilation is a bit of an art, making it so there is plenty of air flow without it being drafty (draft kills the heat retaining function of the feathers). good ventilation will help dry things out somewhat, particularly it helps reduce condensation from all the moisture the birds produce, they emit moisture just roosting there as well as from their droppings.

I'd start with increasing the eaves to get the drip line away from the coop and raising the ground level with lots more litter.
 

Naomi112234

Hatching
Nov 1, 2018
5
1
4
The water seems to be coming from the bottom but the coop is off the ground it's its on breeze blocks. Im going to add extra ventilation at the top of the coop wall on the sides (can't do one of the sides as it forms the roof so water would just drip in.) The roof is perfectly dry. I don't know whether it could be where the walls are connected fully as there are some tiny cracks where water could get in. And I'm thinking that because the floor has carpet glued on (It took me 3 days to remove some of the carpet until I gave up as I cut myself and bled a bit ) so I was going to waterproof the side where there is a slight crack in certain parts but felting it so the water would run off it. And the do the ventilation at the top as there is an over hang of the roof where water won't be able to get in .What do you think?
 

DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
Premium Feather Member
Jul 23, 2018
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Can you post some pictures of your coop? Inside and out?
I think carpet in a coop is a really bad idea. It would be a sponge and hold a lot of moisture and odor. I'd get it out. But maybe I'm not visualizing your setup well.
 

Naomi112234

Hatching
Nov 1, 2018
5
1
4
I will try take the photos when I'm home. I did try getting it out but it's stuck on the wood extremely well I've been trying to find a way of removing it. It seems like it's glued on and they've used some carpet tape.
 

Naomi112234

Hatching
Nov 1, 2018
5
1
4
Luckily it doesn't smell in there it's just damp once you move the bedding out the way I put a lot of bedding down in the chicks house and the ducks houses so the damp doesn't touch the top of the bedding it's just the bottom layer but it's infuriating
 

DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
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Jul 23, 2018
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I will try take the photos when I'm home. I did try getting it out but it's stuck on the wood extremely well I've been trying to find a way of removing it. It seems like it's glued on and they've used some carpet tape.
Have you tried a heat gun and a wide putty knife? I've removed glued on flooring from OSB subfloor that way. The heat softens the glue and makes it MUCH easier to remove. Obviously, the chickens should be far away when you do this.
The guns are not expensive. I picked up mine on Amazon.
 

Naomi112234

Hatching
Nov 1, 2018
5
1
4
I've never heard of that! I'll check it out now .thank you! I tried a wallpaper scraper thing a knife which cut my hand several times.... And a hammer where I used the back bit where you pull nails out to rip the carpet up. Didn't do a great job.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
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Obviously, the chickens should be far away when you do this.
The guns are not expensive. I picked up mine on Amazon.
Yes, and good ventilation for you too......and be very careful, those things can set stuff on fire, have a safe place(metal pan) to set it down between heating and scraping.
Have gone thru a few heat guns, got mine for about $20 at Harbor Freight..other big box stores probably carry them too.

I was just wondering what could I do to stop the house getting wet inside
Need pics to help you find where the wetness is coming in.
 

rosemarythyme

Scarborough Fair
Premium Feather Member
Jul 3, 2016
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Agree with all the comments about taking out the carpet, that's just holding moisture in. Sounds like you need more ventilation too however that won't fix the issue.

My guess is that water's seeping in through gaps in the wall, and possibly that your overhangs are insufficient and allowing water to run down and into any gaps. Water seeping upwards would be a possibility but if the entire unit is elevated, that shouldn't be the cause.
 

MANNA-PRO

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