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Design Tips?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Zahboo, Feb 15, 2009.

  1. Zahboo

    Zahboo Simply Stated

    Feb 3, 2009
    Hope Mills, NC
    I am drawing up plans for my banty coop and have several questions!
    I forgot how hard it was to build a coop, it's been 6 months since I did the one for my standards. So on to the questions... Some are going to be real obvious and stupid:oops:


    1. For standards I know it is 10 feet for run, 4 feet for coop. Bantys get half that, so 5 and 2. Is it okay if for 4 bantys (sebrights and japanese) The run be 6x4 and the coop be 3' by 3' NOT INCLUDING NEST BOX, that is exterior. I plan to have a built in feeder and the waterer in the run (all my chickens love to knock it over) Is this enough space. I let me chickens walk around the yard if my family is outside (barbeque, gardening, but they only free range about 1 hour during colder months and 2 hours spring time.

    2. Can they see color. I will paint the frame work and all on the coop. If they see color, then it will modifty color (i believe color impacts mood) if not I'll just get whatever.

    3. What all is needed to install shingles? I love the look of cedar shakes, but WOW the price. I was going to do shingles that would match the color (like how some have green or red flecks in it)

    4. Do I need to have bedding/ straw, or can I just have linoleum. I clean our the cop everyday, but It's hard with bedding. I have a tractor with linoleum floor and would just wet it and mop. I liked that, but didn't know if it was okay with a coop that is for fuill grown chicks.

    5. The roof is going to be slanted is it high enough if one side of the coop is 2' and then goes up to 3' the roosts will be on the 3' side. Is this enough, for bantys?

    6. are 2x2s good enough for the frame. It's going to be lightweight, no heavy wood and all. Mostly thin wood. I am going for a tractor thing. I would like it to be light, but sturdy.


    7. anything I'm forgetting?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 15, 2009
  2. the-metal-peddler

    the-metal-peddler Out Of The Brooder

    I designed my own coop over the weekend, and before I did, I did several weeks of reading here, 8 months of books, 15 years in metal working, and I have just only finished my own coop design.

    Of course I have read most of the Storey books, but one that seems to be needed most is their editors pick, Country Wisdom & Know How.

    For about 20 bucks, its worth thousands.

    Sorry I can only address your number 6 line.

    As your design will be a tractor, and built from light, thin wood, there is no sturdy in that approach. Think about it, if the Romans didn't cover their boats with tar, they wouldn't float. However they built their ships from heavy logs.

    If you want to keep your tractor light, be able to haul it around, I would suggest you make the frame from 6061 series aluminum square tubing. Of course the over all design would be critical, and I am suggesting that the bottom frame be built more like a car frame.

    With the right design, and materials, your coop can stay light and sturdy.
     
  3. RendonRoo

    RendonRoo Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 7, 2009
    ft. worth
    As far as roofing a coop you only need a hammer, tar paper(that small amount you can pick up scrap off any construction site) , metal edging, and shingles. The shingles have pretty simple instructions on pkg. Not hard to do a little job like a coop. Good luck
     
  4. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    Quote:Chickens have very good, full color vision, just like us. Whether color affects chickens in *the same way* as it does humans, however, is as far as I know 100% unknown. I would suspect it probably doesn't.

    3. What all is needed to install shingles? I love the look of cedar shakes, but WOW the price. I was going to do shingles that would match the color (like how some have green or red flecks in it)

    You'd put down plywood or OSB (I'd really recommend the latter), optionally put on felt underlayment (depends if you can get a small piece and how much you care about minor leaks over time, since it is after all a chicken coop not a house), then you use roofing nails. Get a book on how to do things, you'll need specific instructions on how to shingle. It is easy to do from a book but you do have to do it *right*. Finally you will probably want a tube of roofing cement (like a black caulk type substance) to seal down some edges.

    Be aware that a lot of the fancy types of shingles are special order, and they may not be willing to special order you just *one* box of shingles. I'd check on availability before getting too attached to any particular style.

    4. Do I need to have bedding/ straw, or can I just have linoleum. I clean our the cop everyday, but It's hard with bedding.

    I really really wouldn't skip the bedding. They will be walking around in their poo all the time. That is not healthy. Also linoleum is *slippery* when bare. And you will have to use so much water to get the glued-on poo off, seems like your coop would stay real damp. Just put a thin layer of shavings down if you want to clean daily. Or, possibly better, *don't* clean daily [​IMG] and ahve a thicker layer of bedding. You can put a droppings board under the roost and clean THAT daily (every morning), that will keep your coop MUCH cleaner and air quality much better and give an outlet for your sanitation instincts <g>

    6. are 2x2s good enough for the frame.

    Sure thing, assuming you design it sensibly.

    Have fun,

    Pat​
     
  5. Aero

    Aero Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 9, 2009
    Portland, OR
    Actually, I believe chickens do not have red cones in their eyes. You can shine a red spot on an area of feed and they will eat around it. The red heat lamps are invisible to them. They see the greatest variation between blue and green.

    As for cedar shakes I used reclaimed old cedar fencing and cut the boards into shingles. You can pick up old fences for free on craigslist, and while they are not going to last as long, they are eaisly replaced. If the exterior is at pecking height, don't coat with anything except shellac which is non toxic. I've left mine uncoated and will just replace individual shingles if they rot.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2009
  6. bills

    bills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 4, 2008
    vancouver island
    Pat, what happened to your answer for question #1?

    If the birds are going to be kept inside in the bad weather, for any length of time, I would choose to build a bigger coop. 3'X3' is pretty small in my opinion.
     
  7. sutphindanesnchickens

    sutphindanesnchickens Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 6, 2009
    NorthofColumbus Ohio
    Ok Here goes. New to the forum and have several concerns about my chicken coop. I had to pick the chickens up and put them in it the first and 2nd day because they wouldn't go back in it. So since then I havent let them out to free range because they like to go behind our propand tank fence and gather than go back in the coop....any ideas on how to get them to go back in it rather than just stay out in the cold???? is my chicken door to small? my ramp not wide enough? HELP. NEWBY at chickens.
     
  8. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    Quote:No no no, sorry, totally untrue. That is the whole POINT of chickens, in a way, that they see red quite well. 'Swhy big red combs are such an important display for roosters. 'Swhy they start picking each other apart at the first sight of blood. 'Swhy there have been (successful) attempts to use red contact lenses on chickens' eyes to reduce picking/cannibalism.

    Red heat lamps are not 'invisible' to them (tho they are to some mammals), they just make EVERYthing look red, so that nothing (i.e. bloody tissue) looks any more redder than anything else, thus less picking. In fact many people have noted that red lamps at night keep the chickens awake.

    A quick google will provide you with much further information on the subject.

    A good general rule of thumb (not entirely perfect, but USUALLY right) is that critters who have certain colors on their bodies as display symbols for aggression or mate attraction or other social cues, can SEE those colors pretty well.

    Pat
     
  9. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    Quote:I skipped it cuz I have never kept bantams [​IMG]

    But y'all know I'll always argue for a larger rather than smaller coop, especially in places with weather issues.


    Pat
     
  10. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    Quote:Hi, welcome to byc! [​IMG]

    it is pretty normal for chickens not to know about going back into the coop at night when they are new to the coop. Picking them up and putting them in there is exactly the right thing to do, as is keeping them in there til they clue in a little better [​IMG]

    Is it possible that there is something they don't like, or are having trouble with, in the coop? Could you describe it maybe, or post pictures?

    Good luck,

    Pat
     

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