Do you personally wash your eggs?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Nicole01, Aug 1, 2011.

  1. Nicole01

    Nicole01 Overrun With Chickens

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    I know and read the best way is to leave the egg and wash right before eating. I was wondering if you personally wash after collecting or do you let your eggs sit as is before storing on the counter or fridge? What about the eggs you give away or sell? Do you wash them right away or do you educate the other person about blooms? I'm very curious to what you do. Thank you.[​IMG]
     
  2. andalusn

    andalusn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a bottle of egg wash and wash the eggs and store them in a container. I give eggs away to co-workers, this way I know they are fresh and clean. With some co-workers terrified of brown eggs or an egg not from a brick & mortar grocery store I figure its the best I can do for those who ask and want to know how safe the eggs are. I did have one person let me know he was pretty worried about the blue egg in the carton but it tasted okay.... [​IMG] and was the hen that laid it okay?
     
  3. Tiss

    Tiss Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't wash my eggs unless they are really, really dirty (and then I don't sell those).

    I just take a damp cloth and buff any dirt off of them. I explain about the bloom to the people who buy my eggs and they find it very interesting. I've never had someone not buy because I don't wash them.

    edited to add:

    Too funny about the blue egg. I have had some buyers a little squeamish about blue and green. I even had one lady ask if I could substitute brown or what for them. [​IMG]
     
  4. andalusn

    andalusn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    After I explained that the EE can lay colored eggs other than brown its now become the office "thing" when they get their dozen out of the fridge they open it right up to see if they got a blue egg or not. It's like the prize in a box [​IMG] Then I hear how family members fight over who gets to eat the blue egg when they cook them up.
     
  5. DelcoChix

    DelcoChix Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We keep a small scrubby by the sink, at the end of each day we do rinse/wash off the eggs that have any dirt/manure/etc. on them before they go into the fridge with the rest of my food. If they are clean to begin with, they go in ,as is. We sell about 4-5 dozen a week so we're not into this as a business, more of a personal preference. Personally I clean them off for three main reasons:
    1) I wouldn't want to buy eggs that appeared to be dirty, poop or mud. doesn't matter. Plus the folks we sell to are friends and they use them quickly, they aren't sitting in the store for weeks and weeks.
    2) When I use them personally, I do not care to crack open a fresh egg with 'debris' on it--don't want anything to fall into the batter.
    3) I don't want poop in my fridge.
    Seems to be a personal preference thing, but for the last three years it's worked fine for us.
     
  6. JodyJo

    JodyJo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Aug 1, 2011
  7. Nicole01

    Nicole01 Overrun With Chickens

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    My hubby says I should wash the eggs in a bleach solution. I'm not sold on that idea. He is afraid that if we give out eggs to neighbors and if they get sick, they will put the blame on us. I would like to give any extra eggs away, but I also don't want any crazy neighbor suing us for them getting sick. Maybe I'm over worrying about this. I already have neighbors coming over and requesting free eggs when my girls start laying.

    My husband is contacting the city to see if we need a license to sell eggs. He thinks we are going to have a few extra's since I went crazy and brought home 6 more chicks then we agreed upon. Plus I'm adding 2 more when we hatch eggs this winter.[​IMG]
     
  8. southerndesert

    southerndesert B & M Chicken Ranch

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    In some states it is law that you must wash any eggs sold from your home and others do not require it. Check your local laws for more information....

    If law suits are a worry it is best to know your states laws before selling your eggs to folks you do not know well....
     
  9. ChickiKat

    ChickiKat Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 10, 2011
    Eastern Kansas
    We do not wash our eggs. We had been giving some to the neighbors and they seemed to be okay with it. But the last time they came over we offered eggs and they said no thank you they had just gotten some from the store..... hummmmm I guess they no likey poopy eggs!!!!
     
  10. Young Heritage

    Young Heritage Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My grandfather commercially raised layers for many years. They did not get washed. He always used a hard bristle brush and just brushed anything off that was on them. This was a long time ago so it may not be today's practice. I personally use the same technique and no one has complained and if you look at my eggs they all look clean.
     

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