Do you treat the soil after worming? Hi, my name is Avis.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Avis, Mar 18, 2018.

  1. Avis

    Avis In the Brooder

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    Mar 18, 2018
    Springfield, Illinois
    I recently wormed my hens as you all described in the blog on worming. I use Safeguard in the water. Finishing up on second round and waiting 2 weeks. The question is do I need to do anything about the soil?? The vet I took my hen to for diagnosis mainly or only saw exotic birds. But she said 3 feet of soil in pen needed to be removed and replaced with top soil? I'm not sure that is even possible here. And I've never seen any posts about soil.
     
  2. micstrachan

    micstrachan Free Ranging

    HivAvis. You might want to rename the thread to something about worms. Unfortunately, I don’t know the answer, but I’dvtry not to let them eat off the ground it they had worms. I hope someone else can help!
     
  3. Avis

    Avis In the Brooder

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    Mar 18, 2018
    Springfield, Illinois
    Thank you. I did.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    What type of worms did your vet report seeing in a fecal test? It sounds quite rediculous to have to remove 3 feet of soil from a chicken yard. I would do some research on chicken worms, how they are spread, such as with a host such as snails, slugs, etc. All chickens may have some worms, and most may handle a small worm load without a problem, unless they are immune compromised or have an illness. The more room they have to free range on fresh grass, and not be confined to small areas of dirt or pine shavings, the better their health will be. If they have to be confined, removal of droppings, adding fresh pine shavings with daily stirring is good practice. In warm tropical areas, more frequent worming may be required. Most of us do not worm that often, and getting a fecal test done before treatment is wise. Round worms are common, followed by less common cecal worms, gapeworms, capillary worms, and tapeworms, plus hookworms, which are more rare.
     
  5. Avis

    Avis In the Brooder

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    Mar 18, 2018
    Springfield, Illinois
    She said round worms. I've raised chickens for years and never had a problem. She did several tests but didn't seem to own her advice or diagnosis. She contacted local U of I extension for more information. They said production laying issues and round worms, to treat with dewormer. They will be free ranging soon as weather breaks and I can get some tunnels made. Not sure what to do about soil! I'm leaning toward letting it set unoccupied for several months after sell hens. But would like others advice on the issue of soil tx.
     

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