Does anyone else hold their ducks like this?

Celeeste

In the Brooder
May 16, 2020
63
40
43
Holding them like this seems to calm them down a bit. Also it's one way to not get scratched by them. All of them besides Mina our mallard seem
to like it, of course most mallard don't like people so that's not surprising.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20200530_121958.jpg
    IMG_20200530_121958.jpg
    657.3 KB · Views: 10
  • IMG_20200530_121842.jpg
    IMG_20200530_121842.jpg
    795.4 KB · Views: 10
  • IMG_20200530_121835.jpg
    IMG_20200530_121835.jpg
    563.4 KB · Views: 10
  • IMG_20200530_121650.jpg
    IMG_20200530_121650.jpg
    507.9 KB · Views: 9
  • IMG_20200530_121608.jpg
    IMG_20200530_121608.jpg
    563.6 KB · Views: 8
  • IMG_20200530_121557.jpg
    IMG_20200530_121557.jpg
    556.7 KB · Views: 8

Stipenvlerk

Crowing
May 22, 2020
1,446
2,898
286
The Netherlands
I mostly only put them on their back (between my legs) to inspect their feet. One of them loves a good food massage. Sleeps in a minute when I do that. But the position is not natural I believe so :) Otherwise not..
 

FeatherLace

Chirping
Apr 7, 2020
372
451
93
Waycross, Georgia
I know its pretty bad to lay chickens on their back as the reason it calms them is it triggers kind of a "freeze" fear response, so I wouldn't be comfortable holding them like that.
Though I'm not an expert, this is just things I've heard from the internet and others who have studied birds. No clue if its true or applies to ducks
 

Celeeste

In the Brooder
May 16, 2020
63
40
43
I know its pretty bad to lay chickens on their back as the reason it calms them is it triggers kind of a "freeze" fear response, so I wouldn't be comfortable holding them like that.
Though I'm not an expert, this is just things I've heard from the internet and others who have studied birds. No clue if its true or applies to ducks
Oh, I wasn't meaning to strike fear into them, I read somewhere that others did it so I started doing it. I might stop knowing that. Even if it's not true I don't want to make them dislike me even more.
 

FeatherLace

Chirping
Apr 7, 2020
372
451
93
Waycross, Georgia
Oh, I wasn't meaning to strike fear into them, I read somewhere that others did it so I started doing it. I might stop knowing that. Even if it's not true I don't want to make them dislike me even more.
Its okay a lot of people mistake it for them being comfortable, and some might be! But for a lot of them, if you've ever seen a dead prey animal such as a bird or rabbit, (depending on the predator), most of the time their guts are torn out. Ive heard that when they are flipped over like that their brain basically tells them that they are about to be gutted.
Again this is just what I've read from others, I am no expert!

But to me this made a lot of sense, especially when I had my chicks, they would calm down and fall asleep when on their backs, but they always HATED me as soon as I'd set them down and try to pick them up again. I assume it's because they didn't want to be put in a terrifying position again
 

Celeeste

In the Brooder
May 16, 2020
63
40
43
Its okay a lot of people mistake it for them being comfortable, and some might be! But for a lot of them, if you've ever seen a dead prey animal such as a bird or rabbit, (depending on the predator), most of the time their guts are torn out. Ive heard that when they are flipped over like that their brain basically tells them that they are about to be gutted.
Again this is just what I've read from others, I am no expert!

But to me this made a lot of sense, especially when I had my chicks, they would calm down and fall asleep when on their backs, but they always HATED me as soon as I'd set them down and try to pick them up again. I assume it's because they didn't want to be put in a terrifying position again
Yeah, they still kick when I touch their bellies. It could be part of why they still run away from me after so much human interaction. I do it sometime so I don't get scratched up, but I guess I'll stop it.
 

FeatherLace

Chirping
Apr 7, 2020
372
451
93
Waycross, Georgia
Yeah, they still kick when I touch their bellies. It could be part of why they still run away from me after so much human interaction. I do it sometime so I don't get scratched up, but I guess I'll stop it.
How I avoid getting scratched with my chickens is I will slide my hand under their front and tuck their legs between two of my fingers so they can't kick and theyre still upright, and I'll either tuck them under my arm or cover their wings with my other hand. I try to avoid picking them up from the top since it makes them feel like a predator swooping down on them, but when I am in a hurry I just put my hands over their wings and slightly tucked under their body then move them to under my arm.

There's a picture of how I hold one of my Bantams
 

Attachments

  • 20200511_164212.jpg
    20200511_164212.jpg
    421.9 KB · Views: 6

Celeeste

In the Brooder
May 16, 2020
63
40
43
How I avoid getting scratched with my chickens is I will slide my hand under their front and tuck their legs between two of my fingers so they can't kick and theyre still upright, and I'll either tuck them under my arm or cover their wings with my other hand. I try to avoid picking them up from the top since it makes them feel like a predator swooping down on them, but when I am in a hurry I just put my hands over their wings and slightly tucked under their body then move them to under my arm.

There's a picture of how I hold one of my Bantams
Sounds like a good idea. With my chickens I just let them perch on me, but I could probably do that with them as well. They don't really scratch much though
 

FeatherLace

Chirping
Apr 7, 2020
372
451
93
Waycross, Georgia
Sounds like a good idea. With my chickens I just let them perch on me, but I could probably do that with them as well. They don't really scratch much though
My chickens and one of my turkeys perches on me too, but if they suddenly decide to fly off then that claw leverage hurts lol. Ive found that this way (the one in the picture) works to pick them up without scaring them, as they can still get away. I know this because all of them are calm except the roosters, who hate being held for some reason. They flap their wings and kick until I release them or hold their wings down (if I need to hold them for any reason). All you do is release that bit of pressure that you're using between your fingers to keep their legs there (not much so they get hurt) and they're able to fly away
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom