Does anyone know what this could be? Fowl Pox?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by zboyrocks1, Sep 7, 2010.

  1. zboyrocks1

    zboyrocks1 New Egg

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    Most of the pics I've found online aren't close up or are of wart like growths. We noticed one spot on the back of his neck about a week ago and thought one of the other turkeys pecked him. Our turkeys are "pets" so we give them treats and when I was giving him some treats yesterday I noticed these funny looking round spots on his head, neck, and wattle. Kind of looks like he's starting to rot :-(
    They aren't wet or oozy but more dry and scab like. He doesn't act like they bother him at all. He otherwise is acting fine and eating and drinking good.
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  2. RedRoosterFarm

    RedRoosterFarm **LOVE MY SERAMAS**

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    Yuck! Poor thing. I wish I could tell you. Bump
     
  3. hinkjc

    hinkjc Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    That's what it looks like to me. I don't have experience with it, but from what I've read I do believe they get fowl pox from mosquitos and most times will heal on their own. Keep an eye for wet pox..that one is more dangerious and can interfere with their ability to drink/eat since it gets in their mouth.
     
  4. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Fowl pox comes in two versions, wet and dry. Usually they get the dry, which gives them black flat blotches mostly on their comb, and will run its course and go away, usually with no treatment unless they get a secondary skin infection. The wet pox is much more serious but is inside the mouth. I have no idea what your bird has, but it's not fowl pox. We had the dry pox last year. I lost one to secondary infection of the face. It's similar to chicken pox, in that once they have it, they are immune. I believe it is correct that it comes from mosquitos.
     

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