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Dogs scared off a Coyote

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by MetalFarm, Oct 5, 2015.

  1. Primo

    Primo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 1, 2013
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    Yes, a coyote will jump a 4 foot fence like it is not even there. I lost a pygmy goat this way a year ago. My yard was also 1 acre. I built an internal safe area for them to spend the night. 25x25 6 foot horse fence with an apron to prevent digging. A coyote can still go over a 6 foot fence, but the multiple barriers kept them safe (or relatively safe). I have since moved to a place with more land and more coyotes. I built a similar safe area but also surronded by electric. If you do electric, put it out a couple feet from your fence. They will hit it first and the added visual barrier of the 4 foot fence behind will keep them at bay
     
  2. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Flock Master Premium Member

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    Out to pasture
    If there is a pack of coyotes they will draw your dogs farther out and then ambush them or distract them while others attack the farm animals.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. MetalFarm

    MetalFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So in thinking setting a couple traps in the bean field is my best option at this point. It's either that or sell my goats.

    Is trapping going to do the job?

    Will they go away once the beans have been plowed and the brush has died off??

    Thanks for all the great replies!
     
  4. MetalFarm

    MetalFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What about wolf urine??
     
  5. LeafBlade12345

    LeafBlade12345 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Wolf urine almost never works. They are hard to trap and that is only a temporary solution until new ones come. You should invest in an electric fence, it is well worth your time and money and works for a multitude of scenarios.
     
  6. April Petroski

    April Petroski Out Of The Brooder

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    If you don't mind trapping, it is a great additional source of income when hides are good and with winter coming, hides are getting good! I have a lamancha and a nigerian, both does, that both had sets of boy and girl babies. The frickin coyotes got the first doeling in broad daylight and the second doeling about a week later followed by all 7 of our chickens in one night. I've been super vigilant about making sure all the little animals are locked up at night and since the coyotes killed our neighbor's blue heeler in front of our house, i have a few rifles out and ready with a flashlight right next to each. They are awful by us. I don't mind one bit skinning and drying hides! If you don't want to deal with it yourself, if you call your Department of natural resources, they can hopefully get you in touch with a nuisance trapper who can do it for you. Are your goats disbudded? My nigerian has her horns and she does NOT like canines or felines, domestic or otherwise and has no problem rolling our dogs when they arent paying attention to her
     
  7. Mutt Farm

    Mutt Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    You're welcome. I'm going to say ditto on everything that's been offered so far. April and I must be neighbors! Here, seems they send in one a couple times to grab a snack and look around, then they'll strike in a pack and kill everything. A neighbor lost most of his chickens, 8 turkeys and his dog in one night. 6' horse fencing run with several strands of hot wire around the Pigmys and chickens should do it, or electric poultry netting to free range. You can pick the size. About the goats, what is their fence like and how big is their area? I have an idea... Could you post pictures of the areas to give us a better take? If the goat pen isn't too big I may have a solution.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. LeafBlade12345

    LeafBlade12345 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Hotwire is inexpensive and easy to set up, and it is nicer looking than electric fencing. You should probably try one of you want to get rid of your predator problems long term. Good luck!
     
  9. MetalFarm

    MetalFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The gist area is small. Maybe 16x16. It's t-posts with welded wire and has pallets running the perimeter inside the welded wire. The chicken run is next to it and the same size made of welded with wth 4x4s and had poultry netting for a roof. The hen house is connected to the run and secure at night.

    At this point I'm thinking of picking up a trap tomorrow and seeing what happens. I am pretty stressed about it but they goats are pets and if I can't protect them I'll give them away or sell them rather than watch them get eaten.

    I'll upload a picture now.
     
  10. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    Inexpensive is a relative term and varies drastically by plot size... Electric fences and wires might be inexpensive and a good choice for some to protect against predators, for others they can be very costly and impractical...
     

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