DUBBING, anyone?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chicksalot, Oct 7, 2008.

  1. chicksalot

    chicksalot Chillin' With My Peeps

    180
    1
    111
    Sep 20, 2008
    WI
    I have been researching chicken health issues before my birds arrive. We have VERY cold winters here & I remember from childhood, some birds freezing combs, toes, etc. I am considering dubbing my birds to prevent tissue damage due to freezing winter temps...any advice from those having experience in this area??? Thank You [​IMG]
     
  2. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    You are very wise to research these issues before you get chickens. If more folks did that, this forum might be half empty, LOL! [​IMG]

    I have not yet heard of folks on the forum dubbing for winter protection, but I now live in the mid-South where the only dubbing that takes place is for "game" (fighting) breeds. While I expect other northerners will soon submit info on this, my own research has suggested a couple of other safeguards against winter weather:

    1) choose winter-hardy breeds - those with heavier feathering, and more importantly, small combs and wattles.
    2) use coop and run insulation, construction, and/or heating that helps maintain decent temps.

    In that light, you might (if you haven't already) do a quick search of the coop and run construction section of the forum. Very informative.

    Again, kudos to you for researching!
     
  3. chicksalot

    chicksalot Chillin' With My Peeps

    180
    1
    111
    Sep 20, 2008
    WI
    Thank you, Jenski, for your input. I also have read about application of vasiline as a possibility of keeping frostbite at bay, but this is something that would need to be reapplied, which means catching the birds everytime. Yes I am making sure to include ways to keep the birds warmer in the coop, ie.. insulation, use of plastics to block wind, using perches wider so they can cover their own feet while roosting, etc. But, sometimes 'book learning' needs to be supplemented by good ol' experience...so I want to thank you again for your advice & thank others in advance for your help. [​IMG]
     
  4. leslie

    leslie Out Of The Brooder

    54
    0
    29
    Apr 21, 2008
    And Im waiting for someone to add "and what is dubbing" I guess its up to me.. could it be that you cut the comb off? surely not.. surely not....
     
  5. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:Yes. Dubbing is when the comb is cut down. Im starting to raise Old English bantams, and that is what breeders do to the cocks if they show them. To show a cock that isnt dubbed, is a Disqualification.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2009
  6. MagsC

    MagsC Queen Of Clueless

    Jul 27, 2008
    Minnesota
    I had never heard of it before either!
     
  7. Hangin Wit My Peeps

    Hangin Wit My Peeps AutumnBreezeChickens.com

    6,396
    10
    263
    Apr 20, 2008
    Birnamwood, Wisconsin
    OH no, no...please let them keep their comb [​IMG] It's very sad to see dubbed chickens. They will be fine in the winter just put a heat lamp in their coop when the weather is suppose to get 0 or below. That's what I plan on doing. Well, I already had my hens heat lamp on but I'm a wuss! I can't handle it when I think they are cold [​IMG] It got to 24 here a few night ago and their heat lamp was on. And it stayed about 55 in their coop [​IMG]
     
  8. Hangin Wit My Peeps

    Hangin Wit My Peeps AutumnBreezeChickens.com

    6,396
    10
    263
    Apr 20, 2008
    Birnamwood, Wisconsin
    Yes. Dubbing is when the comb is cut down. Im starting to raise Old English bantams, and that is what breeders do to the cocks if they show them. To show a cock that isnt dubbed, is a Disqualification. I wont be doing that to my birds.

    OH my is this really true!? That is so weird to me. You would think for showing they would have to be natural.​
     
  9. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    :d
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2009
  10. OHChick

    OHChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    381
    3
    149
    May 8, 2007
    hi there... my roo got frostbite BIG TIME on his comb this past winter, so now what used to be tips are smoothed off. he was bad off for a while, the girls picked at his sores and he was all bloody, it was gross. mine are kept plenty warm but when they go out in the snow and drink water, the roos can't help but to splash it up on their combs.

    one of our colleagues sent me a link to his site about dubbing. he lives in a very cold climate and said it's a necessity to protect the chickens.

    at this point only my roo was affected and i chose not to trim his comb but if he gets it this winter once again, i may reconsider.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by