Dynamics of 2 or more roos instead of one

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Ellie, May 20, 2011.

  1. Ellie

    Ellie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 10, 2007
    Redding, Ca.
    I have only had one rooster at a time, but am now going to have at least two and maybe three. Harvey and Stanley are 14 and 16 weeks old. They are brothers so they do get along so far. For those of you who have more than one rooster, I would love to know how the dynamics work

    For example, my lone rooster was king of the roost. He fed the girls and got them in at night. Do they both try to get them in? Do they choose their women or do they share?

    These roos will be housed in the coop at night with 25 hens. They will be out free ranging on 3 acres all day.

    I am really interested in rooster behavior so tell me about your roos if you have more than one.

    Thanks,
     
  2. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri
    Options will be a matter or what resources you have.

    First, how many acres available to birds if free range? Or how many coops / runs?
     
  3. Ellie

    Ellie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 10, 2007
    Redding, Ca.
    3 acres one coop and one run.
     
  4. sarahjane2740

    sarahjane2740 New Egg

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    May 19, 2011
    I think they tend to pick their hens. My friend has two roos for about 20 hens. The big roo has about 14 hens, the younger roo about 6. She had to get rid of the younger roo though cos he was so rough with the girls - He killed one when she struggled.

    I think you can only introduce new roos to old ones when the newbie is still young though, otherwise the old roo is pretty threatened.

    Im not very experienced though, so wait for some more responses too!
     
  5. Ellie

    Ellie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 10, 2007
    Redding, Ca.
    Yeah, I agree about introducing new roos. These two or three are being raised together and I don't have a roo at this time so I think it should be ok. So far, they hang out together and I am hoping that they don't fight.

    They are cochins so that should help somewhat too, in my thinking since they are a pretty docile breed.

    I can't wait to hear from more people with more than one rooster.
     
  6. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri
    Three acres a little tight for a two flock free-range system unless birds can be allowed to go in two directions off property.

    First option is simply letting two juveniles grow up in flock. For a time after reaching maturity they will be satellites which means they will operate at periphery of flock, occasional court and mate with a hen but otherwise be low on pecking order.

    If space adequate one subordinate might be able to acquire a hen(s) of his own, assuming they have location where they can roost separately from others. Then in all likelihood their range will be largely separate from main flock, so more acreage reaquired. At some point, one or both young roosters will challenge the elder and a scrap will ensue. Then either ranks will be maintained or a new alpha roo will run show, for a while.

    You could also keep a rooster with a hen or two in each of your coop and run. Be carefull of birds fighting thru wire.

    All this is a function of avalable space, number of birds, and breeds they repressent.

    I have been able to encourage multiple flocks by making roosts in different locations.

    For me the fun is watching the free-range behaviors where roosters compete for ladies through wooing and occasional combat. If adequate resources present, then even may games can have a territory which they defend through display rather than always resorting to outright combat.

    Gets even more fun when rooster gets involved with reproduction beyond covering hens. They acquire food, scan for predators, and sometimes engage the smaller threats.


    This shotgun explaination but can become more detailed as you progress.
     
  7. myfester

    myfester Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 8, 2009
    Oxford, PA
    I had one bantam cochin roo, then 2 silkie roo brothers. All were within their first year, so got a long just fine. I only have 8 hens, 1 coop and 1 acre. That first year was fine. Well, this Spring their rooster hormones were raging. All 3 fought with each other [​IMG]. Most of the time, the brothers stuck together to pick on the cochin and if I took the cochin away from them...the brothers fought together. Although all 3 are mellow roos, they did drawl an awful lot of blood from each others combs. I ended up giving away one of the brothers. They are (so far) getting a long a lot brother. I'm thinking you might be ok with 2 roo's, but 3 might be an issue since only one can be Alpha, but neither the other 2 want to be bottom roo.
     
  8. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    I have a surfeit of roosters, myself: 9 sexually mature and who knows how many in the 37 youngsters already out in the flock or still brooding inside.

    They're on an acre, but do not range over that entire space. I have multiple coops, but some Roos are BFFs and roost with each other, side by side on the bar.

    Only had one fight and it was a challenger to the dominant rooster's throne. All noise and fury, some feathers flew, no injuries, and the challenger went for the Boss Roo when he was cornered. Didn't matter, as the challenger gave up and there have been NO fights at all, since. A couple younger Roos will square off and chest bump or display at each other, but no fights with any damage.

    The younger, lower ranking Roos sneak in their hen jumping when the boss rooster is out of sight. Otherwise, they don't get any action.
     
  9. Ellie

    Ellie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 10, 2007
    Redding, Ca.
    I don't know about the third one yet. Can't tell if it is a he or she. They are golden laced cochins and their markings are identical so it leads me to believe that it may be a roo. It acts like a girl though.

    Seems from y'all that it could indeed work well and I just need to keep an eye on them. Right now, they are never apart because there are 'big' chickens out there. That is always the case with the young'uns being introduced. They have some smaller than they are as well, so they are kind of in the middle of the flock as far as age. Those cochins are a broody bunch, so I have new ones on the way!!

    This is so interesting.
     

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