Editing photos, The difference.

The Kooky Kiwi

Songster
Dec 23, 2017
292
850
156
New Zealand, Golden Bay
I'm liking ALL of the photo's previously pictured... and I will prefix my next comment with my belief that the correct amount of photo editing is the amount that results in the picture that YOU like to look at :) That being said - to "my eyes" I find that many of the previous photo's have had their colour oversaturated and the pictures, while vibrant, no longer look natural. Depends on what you are trying to achieve with your picture though!

Some handy and "general" tips for taking photos of your birds:

Use the rule of thirds - it's not an "absolute must" but it works well to balance your picture.

Practice your focusing skills - your eye is often drawn to a part of the photo that is most in focus and a blurry photo may not showcase your subject in the way you want. For a headshot it's often effective to aim to have the eye in focus.

Get up close and/or fill your frame with your subject - a bird in the distance gets lost in the picture and their features are less visible when far away.

Try to avoid things that distract from your subject - For example brightly colored or odd items in the background can draw the eye away from your subject.

Example of an "ok" photo: Lacy here is placed in the middle third of the picture frame, takes up about one third of the picture, the focus is on her brow (I wanted to show her comb and ear so focused in between the two), and my daughter wore a plain and non distracting jumper.
Lacey Comb.jpg

Example of a photo that is "ok" but could be improved: Nugget here is placed in the middle third of the picture frame (ok) but only takes up about a quarter of the picture, she kind of gets lost in all that green grass and I also find my daughters gumboots to be a bit of a distraction - they draw my attention away from Nugget. I would suggest a combination of getting closer, using my camera's zoom features and/or cropping the picture.
Nugget.jpg

Number one rule = Have Fun!!
 
Apr 29, 2020
419
1,763
181
Casper, Wyoming
I'm liking ALL of the photo's previously pictured... and I will prefix my next comment with my belief that the correct amount of photo editing is the amount that results in the picture that YOU like to look at :) That being said - to "my eyes" I find that many of the previous photo's have had their colour oversaturated and the pictures, while vibrant, no longer look natural. Depends on what you are trying to achieve with your picture though!

Some handy and "general" tips for taking photos of your birds:

Use the rule of thirds - it's not an "absolute must" but it works well to balance your picture.

Practice your focusing skills - your eye is often drawn to a part of the photo that is most in focus and a blurry photo may not showcase your subject in the way you want. For a headshot it's often effective to aim to have the eye in focus.

Get up close and/or fill your frame with your subject - a bird in the distance gets lost in the picture and their features are less visible when far away.

Try to avoid things that distract from your subject - For example brightly colored or odd items in the background can draw the eye away from your subject.

Example of an "ok" photo: Lacy here is placed in the middle third of the picture frame, takes up about one third of the picture, the focus is on her brow (I wanted to show her comb and ear so focused in between the two), and my daughter wore a plain and non distracting jumper.
View attachment 2427931

Example of a photo that is "ok" but could be improved: Nugget here is placed in the middle third of the picture frame (ok) but only takes up about a quarter of the picture, she kind of gets lost in all that green grass and I also find my daughters gumboots to be a bit of a distraction - they draw my attention away from Nugget. I would suggest a combination of getting closer, using my camera's zoom features and/or cropping the picture.
View attachment 2427941

Number one rule = Have Fun!!
Wow! Thank you for this great advice. I haven't been editing for very long and having someone say what they like/don't like about it helps every edited photo get a little better!
 

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