Egg Yolks For Chicks

jesnbec

Chirping
10 Years
Nov 24, 2009
11
7
77
We have about a dozen or so week old chicks, we give them medicated chick starter and a little apple cider vinegar (with the mother) in their water. They haven't been handled as much as we'd like due to a brooder with high walls (too high but we're working on it), and we want to try to associate ourselves with some kind of treat to help correct that. Boiled and mashed egg yolk was what we were considering, but couldn't figure out if they would need grit to eat yolk or not. Thanks in advance for any advice! They are Silver Laced Polish and Splash Cochins if that makes any difference. Some of the Polish are getting mild cases of Pasty Butt, nothing serious and we stay on top of it but supposedly the yolks could help with that as well...
 

jesnbec

Chirping
10 Years
Nov 24, 2009
11
7
77
Also, where would one find grit of an appropriate size for bitties, is that something they sell or should I just scoop them some sod and set it in there, they are only a week old at this point...
 

gtaus

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Mar 29, 2019
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Also, where would one find grit of an appropriate size for bitties, is that something they sell or should I just scoop them some sod and set it in there, they are only a week old at this point...

I live on a lake, and just used sand for the chicks until they were old enough for large grit. Many people around where I live just use common sand those first weeks. I don't think any stores around here sell #1 grit (size of sand), but the big box stores sell play sand for sandboxes. I would think that would work if you don't have access to sand.

If your sod has sand in it, that might work as well. I prefer not to put dirt in my brooder because it can get messy, but that might work. If you do that, I'd dig up a little clump of soil with grass so the chicks can get used to eating your local grass. All assuming you don't use any pesticides on your lawn....
 

loohoo

Songster
May 9, 2020
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126
Southern Ohio, US
I believe they need grit if they're eating anything other than chick starter food. We bought chick grit at TSC that we gave to ours when we began giving them treats, but I've seen others have used gritty sand, etc.
 

GC-Raptor

Free Ranging
5 Years
Jul 26, 2016
5,683
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Connecticut, USA
Egg yolks should be fine without Grit.
I get Chick Grit at TSC and offer at 2 weeks old mixed in the Starter feed at a ratio of 1 to 40 by weight.
2 ounces Grit to 5 lbs of Feed.
I mix together for 8 weeks.
20200507_165144_resized_1_kindlephoto-250870.jpg

I offer Adult size Poultry Grit separately after 7 weeks.
20200507_174823_resized_kindlephoto-443533.jpg

If you can't find Chick Grit at the store, but they have Poultry Grit. You could sift it through a colander with round holes. I learned that from @aart GC
 
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Doc7

Songster
May 12, 2018
747
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Central Virginia
They don’t need grit for eggs and yogurt, can also mix either one with starter.

I usually serve yogurt with “Chick Grit” (sold on the shelf right next to adult grit) not parakeet grit etc mixed into it, some just do a separate tin (6-10 chicks will eat a few tablespoons of grit if you leave it in coop, don’t panic this is totally fine.) after that feel free to leave some sod or give them some treats but remember:

just because it looks like a great Instagram pic such as sliced veggies, diced fruit, arranged delicately on a platter for your chicks to eat, this is WORSE for them to eat than their chick starter. Feel free to feed treats sparingly, but to a chicken, these delicious looking healthy foods we all should eat more of, are junk food!
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
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aart

Chicken Juggler!
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gtaus

Free Ranging
Mar 29, 2019
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Northern Minnesota
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I believe they need grit if they're eating anything other than chick starter food. We bought chick grit at TSC that we gave to ours when we began giving them treats, but I've seen others have used gritty sand, etc.

I did not think grit was important for chicks in the brooder eating only commercial chick starter feed. However, a lady with 30+ years of raising chicks told me it was a better practice to start offering chic grit as soon as possible because sometimes chicks will eat their bedding (in my case pine shavings over wood chips) and that can lead to pasty butt. The chick starter feed itself does not require grit. I simply put a small jar lid with sand in it and filled it up if it went empty.

None of my 10 chicks developed pasty butt, but I can't say if it was the sand grit or not. I did not feed my chicks anything other than chick starter for the first 3-4 weeks. Treats and kitchen scraps were slowly introduced in very small amounts. I cut a piece of sod with dirt attached and gave it to my chicks about week 6 so they had an idea of what was coming their way in a few weeks when I transferred them outside to the coop and run.
 

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