Eggs Safe?

Sportsman94

Chirping
Mar 24, 2021
51
98
63
Central Georgia
So the backstory. We have 14 chickens (2 cockerels, 1 pullet, and 11 hens). We have had a broody hen for the past couple weeks (hatched some chicks today.) she has been laying in one of two nesting boxes the whole time. Before she went broody we were getting 7-9 eggs a day out of these. Today, after the broody had come down from the box with some of her chicks, we pulled around 6-7 unhitched eggs out of her box and an additional 9 out of the other box. My question isn’t about the ones she was sitting on. It’s about the ones out of the other box. Would other hens have moved eggs out from under her while she was out of the box and before I got out there? 9 seems like a stellar day and I feel like she definitely didn’t lay one the same day the others hatched. Would you trust eating all 9? Is there a way to check and see if they are still good?
 

JubileeFarmer

Chirping
Apr 15, 2021
59
211
71
Mid Willamette Valley (Oregon)
If the hen was sitting on them they would be partially developed which you could determine by candling. If they're is no development you can use the float test to determine if they are edible.

Place an egg in a glass or other small container full of water. The water should be deep enough to submerge the egg.
  • Very fresh eggs will sink and lay on their sides.
  • Fairly recent, but not fresh, eggs will sink but the large end will rise off the bottom. These are still safe to eat.
  • Old eggs will float. Throw these out.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
9 Years
Nov 27, 2012
100,731
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SW Michigan
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you can use the float test to determine if they are edible.

Place an egg in a glass or other small container full of water. The water should be deep enough to submerge the egg.
  • Very fresh eggs will sink and lay on their sides.
  • Fairly recent, but not fresh, eggs will sink but the large end will rise off the bottom. These are still safe to eat.
  • Old eggs will float. Throw these out.
Ehhh......
Floating an egg will only tell you how old it might be.
They float due to evaporation when older.
It will not tell you if an egg is 'good' or 'bad'.
Plus then you've wetted the egg so it should be thoroughly washed and refrigerated.


When in doubt....
Open eggs one at a time in a separate dish before adding to pan or recipe,
use your eyes, nose, and common sense to decide if egg is OK to eat.



 

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