electric fencing for predator control/control ideas

cavemanrich

Addict
7 Years
Apr 6, 2014
18,577
67,626
1,317
Melrose Park Illinois
My husband says no to the electric fence. :-( but he does pee on the tree near their coop for me.
Does he also pee on the fence???.. Maybe I know why he objects electricity..
electricity_wins_every_battle_against_humanity_10.gif
 

dorklandresident

Chirping
Nov 30, 2021
82
172
96
Massachusetts, USA
Does he also pee on the fence???.. Maybe I know why he objects electricity..
View attachment 2917964
Lmao, no he does not pee in the fence. He objects because he thinks I am getting overly obsessive and spending too much money on three chickens. He thinks it would be cheaper just to get more chickens if these ones get killed. I don't see it that way because I feel as though the predators will just keep coming back and killing chickens once they realize there is an easy meal.
 

cmom

Hilltop Farm
14 Years
Nov 18, 2007
29,992
31,866
951
Florida
My Coop
My Coop
You are correct. Once a predator makes a kill they will keep coming back and lurk looking for an opportunity. Lessons learned the hard way. Now nothing messes with my birds with the electric wires up. Good luck...

They know the electric wires are around the coops and pens.
 

Fountain Farms LLC

In the Brooder
Dec 6, 2021
5
26
34
Not sure if this is an option, but we use lgds to guard against predators. They are a great deterrent, but if a predator gets in their "territory" it's usually a pretty quick solution.
We have 9 Anatolian Sheppards, granted they have a sheep and goat herd to protect as well and a lot of area to patrol. They do it with minimal training. A single or preferably pair will stop anything short of a mt lion or bear.
 

dorklandresident

Chirping
Nov 30, 2021
82
172
96
Massachusetts, USA
Not sure if this is an option, but we use lgds to guard against predators. They are a great deterrent, but if a predator gets in their "territory" it's usually a pretty quick solution.
We have 9 Anatolian Sheppards, granted they have a sheep and goat herd to protect as well and a lot of area to patrol. They do it with minimal training. A single or preferably pair will stop anything short of a mt lion or bear.
I wish! That would be great!, But I only have a half acre and I live near a street, so I don't think it would work well. I would absolutely love to have big dogs though
 

clevylee

Hatching
Dec 11, 2021
1
2
1
I have 10 cinnamon queen chickens. To solve our racoon problem, I installed a 2 wire electric fence. The bottom grounding wire is about 5" above ground with several 6' deep copper stakes attached. The upper charging wire is about 10" above ground. The 500' fence charging machine packs quite a wallop for the 100' fence around my chicken coop. I keep the grass in front of the fence cut low, so the racoons have good grounding. Since last February after the installation, I've had no racoon problem.
 

Judy Todd

Songster
Dec 27, 2017
225
386
128
Yacolt Wa.
Not sure if this is an option, but we use lgds to guard against predators. They are a great deterrent, but if a predator gets in their "territory" it's usually a pretty quick solution.
We have 9 Anatolian Sheppards, granted they have a sheep and goat herd to protect as well and a lot of area to patrol. They do it with minimal training. A single or preferably pair will stop anything short of a mt lion or bear.
I , totally agree withthat. I had a rescue LGD for 3years until she got cancer. Never lost a chicken, all chickens freeranged on 2 acres. She slept in the open or in the barn. Sure miss tht gal.
 

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