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Electric netting... pics of your set up / set up ideas portable nests?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by BlackDogPack, Jul 9, 2011.

  1. BlackDogPack

    BlackDogPack Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 8, 2011
    Ok, so I think I am going to order 164' of electric poultry netting. I want a large area that is movable (even if it's not 'easy' that's ok but I can't think of another way to be able to move a large area). I want my layers in it. Obviously I realize some might try to fly out, and I'll either clip their wings or just let them stay in the yard. I was going for the idea of having as 'free range' of chickens as possible but keeping them up, they are killing my flower beds. And not to mention how many eggs I can't find! I have a large flock.

    So, some ideas I needed was for a portable laying box area/coop. I had a few ideas. One was the canopy type deals, I have my food under one now that is lowered. It's the kind that the legs can move up and down and snap into place, in the down position it does a good job of keeping the feeders dry. I could modify another one into what I want, and it would be sorta portable. But the biggest flaw I see is what's already happened to the other - wind. The other one's usable, but even anchored down the wind still tore it up some.

    Another idea was using some chain link panels and actually setting up a 'coop'. I could tarp the sides and the top, and have a coop there that's easy enough to move around every so often.

    And the last question (for now) does anyone use a solar powered system for their nets? I am familiar with how much power the fencing needs, but I have never used a battery or solar powered box before. It will be to far for me to use my existing box. I'll need either a battery powered or solar powered box. Does anyone have any suggestions?

    I'd love to see anyone pictures of their set ups, or if anyone even has anything like what I am trying to do, I'd be interested in seeing how it's managed and hearing ideas.

    Thanks!
     
  2. zookeeper15133

    zookeeper15133 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 22, 2010
    SW PA
    I have the poultry netting and love it!

    To answer your other questions, I need more info.
    Where are you? What is your climate?
    How large a flock do you have?
    What is your soil like?
     
  3. TDM

    TDM Chillin' With My Peeps

    We use Premier double spiked electric permanet for our rotating pasture operation. They are energized by DC chargers with marine 12 volt batteries and solar panels. This particular 200 ft x 200 ft setup is moved once a week,

    [​IMG]
     
  4. BlackDogPack

    BlackDogPack Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 8, 2011
    TDM, how many people does it take to move and how long? That similar to what I am wanting to do. Except we have more woods on the property then anything, so they will be in the woods mostly.
     
  5. BlackDogPack

    BlackDogPack Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 8, 2011
    Quote:NC, hot in the summer. Cold in the winter but minimum snow (usually).
    I have about 40 layers.
    Sand! We live in the Sandhills. [​IMG]
     
  6. TDM

    TDM Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:It takes me two to three hours to move the 200' x 200' permanet to the next area. I do it by myself. The 100' permanet is cumbersome and starts to weigh down on you the 30' or so. I understand the 164' regular poultrynet is much easier to move by yourself.

    To minimize the damage the birds cause around the hen house, I move the wagons to a new location within the fenced area every several days or so. I provide food and water inside and outside the hen houses. The outside feeding stations get moved to a new location every day to minimize the impact. After a complete move I reseed the damaged areas. Also need to fill in areas where the chickens dug holes to take dust baths. It is best to rest the pasture as long as possible before putting the chickens back on it again. There are problems with pathogens if done too early.
     
  7. zookeeper15133

    zookeeper15133 Chillin' With My Peeps

    789
    6
    123
    Apr 22, 2010
    SW PA
    Quote:NC, hot in the summer. Cold in the winter but minimum snow (usually).
    I have about 40 layers.
    Sand! We live in the Sandhills. [​IMG]

    I have the 164' poultry netting. I can put it up by myself in about 1/2 hour, if the path is already cut. I use a weed whacker to cut the path.

    It is nice to have 2 people take it down so 1 can hold the posts and 1 can hold the fold of net.

    If you are mostly in the woods, I don't think the solar charger would be worth the money. But do get the box that includes the ground rod. I have clay soil, so the box with the ground on it wouldn't do me any good. Just get a trickle charger that you can set for 2, 6 or 12 amps. Batteries hold the charge longer if they are charged on 2 amps.

    Maybe you can find an old trailer frame to build a smaller coop than TDM's.

    Good luck!
     

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