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Empty nest syndrome and letting them go-What to do?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by sticksoup, May 7, 2009.

  1. sticksoup

    sticksoup Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 23, 2009
    Bradenton
    I have two Pekins and live on a small pond. They are still growing up and will be under lock and key until they are fully grown. We have many natural predators for chicks~ turtles, hawks, alligators (eek- not seen yet in my pond, but you never know). So, my question is this- Do I just let them go one day and hope they come back? Do I leave the coop open for them at nights? I have no idea how adulthood works for ducks. I would be happy keeping them under lock and key forever but I know they would be happier in the pond.

    It seems all the raising ducks articles are about getting them to adulthood~

    Advice please!
     
  2. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    Sep 14, 2008
    Adair Co., KY
    With all those predators it would be best if you 'train' them to go in a coop at night. Also, if there are any gators or turtles in the pond, you will know by how the ducks act. A friend of mine when I lived in Florida had gotten a gator in her pond once. The ducks wouldn't go near the water. Now mine, here in KY, will avoid the deaper water if a snapping turtle has come to visit. I haven't had any problems with hawks with my ducks, I guess it helps that the ducks are probably twice as big as the hawks! But just train them to go in a coop at night, and they should be all right. That way, if you do happen to have a gator come visit you can keep them penned up.
     
  3. chickenannie

    chickenannie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 19, 2007
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    Maybe you can feed them in the coop in the evenings to train them to go in at night.
     

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