Enough ventilation? Or should I add another vent?

Sandbyter

In the Brooder
Jun 12, 2020
35
31
36
Rockland County, NY
Hi,
Still working on my coop for my 5 3-month old girls. I got the large coop from OverEZ. Today I added a vent in the roof overhang over the left window.
Previously we also added a 3rd window in the door (morning sun and breeze comes from that side).

I am wondering if my coop now has enough ventilation for summer and winter.

We live in Rockland County, NY, next to Harriman State Park and it can get pretty cold on winter nights, down to -10 sometimes. I will close all windows in the winter,
There are also 2 small 2" round vents in each eve. Should I close off this vent In the cold or leave it open?
 

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RoosterML

Free Ranging
Nov 5, 2018
3,126
19,433
522
Tolland County Connecticut, USA
Hi,
Still working on my coop for my 5 3-month old girls. I got the large coop from OverEZ. Today I added a vent in the roof overhang over the left window.
Previously we also added a 3rd window in the door (morning sun and breeze comes from that side).

I am wondering if my coop now has enough ventilation for summer and winter.

We live in Rockland County, NY, next to Harriman State Park and it can get pretty cold on winter nights, down to -10 sometimes. I will close all windows in the winter,
There are also 2 small 2" round vents in each eve. Should I close off this vent In the cold or leave it open?
Looks good to me! Personally I would have put the window high on the door not low. You should have some really nice control with what you have going on.
 

rosemarythyme

Crossing the Road
Jul 3, 2016
11,659
21,550
792
WA, Pac NW
My Coop
I will close all windows in the winter,
There are also 2 small 2" round vents in each eve. Should I close off this vent In the cold or leave it open?
If you plan on closing all windows in winter, you need to make up for ventilation elsewhere. Will you be installing more ventilation that stays open year round to make up for the windows being closed?
 

3KillerBs

Crowing
11 Years
Jul 10, 2009
2,177
3,406
346
North Carolina Sandhills
Since heat and ammonia both rise, the most useful ventilation is at the very top of the roof peak.

If you were to replace the tiny, round vents by taking off all the siding above the door trim to replace it with hardware cloth and make an equivalent vent on the other side that would put ventilation in the optimum position -- over the chickens' heads.
 
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Sandbyter

In the Brooder
Jun 12, 2020
35
31
36
Rockland County, NY
If you plan on closing all windows in winter, you need to make up for ventilation elsewhere. Will you be installing more ventilation that stays open year round to make up for the windows being closed?
You mean I need to let some air into the coop to get good ventilation even in winter? I can crack one of the windows open a bit.
 

3KillerBs

Crowing
11 Years
Jul 10, 2009
2,177
3,406
346
North Carolina Sandhills
You mean I need to let some air into the coop to get good ventilation even in winter? I can crack one of the windows open a bit.
Ventilation is even more critical in the winter.

You should prevent wind from blowing on the roost but still ensure a copious supply of fresh air to remove ammonia and moisture.

Chickens have built in down parkas and can easily handle temperatures other than the most extreme cold as long as there is enough ventilation to prevent moisture from collecting. It's the moisture that causes frostbite. :)
 

rosemarythyme

Crossing the Road
Jul 3, 2016
11,659
21,550
792
WA, Pac NW
My Coop
Ventilation is even more critical in the winter.

You should prevent wind from blowing on the roost but still ensure a copious supply of fresh air to remove ammonia and moisture.

Chickens have built in down parkas and can easily handle temperatures other than the most extreme cold as long as there is enough ventilation to prevent moisture from collecting. It's the moisture that causes frostbite. :)
Well said - the goal is not to keep the coop buttoned up and "warm" but rather to keep it as dry as possible. The chickens can keep themselves warm down.

If your area gets extremely cold, let's say -20F or worse, then finding ways to add heat might be necessary.
 

Sandbyter

In the Brooder
Jun 12, 2020
35
31
36
Rockland County, NY
Thanks for all the replies! I am getting used to the idea that more ventilation is most important. It just takes a newbie a while to get used to the idea and not worry so much about the chickens being cold - but that they rather need to be dry and get fresh air.
So I think I will add that second vent and take another look at the sides of the coop under the eves as well.
 

Sandbyter

In the Brooder
Jun 12, 2020
35
31
36
Rockland County, NY
Looks good to me! Personally I would have put the window high on the door not low. You should have some really nice control with what you have going on.
I placed the 3rd window low to allow cool air to enter the coop at the bottom and let the warm/humid air escape higher up through the other 2 windows and the vents. I figured I'll get some nice circulation going that way.
 

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